Developing Scientific Literacy: Using News Media In The Classroom: Using News Media in the Classroom

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McGraw-Hill Education (UK), Mar 1, 2007 - Education - 216 pages
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Developing Scientific Literacy addresses the gap of the revelance of science in everyday life, offering a much-needed framework for teachers wishing to explore science in the media in secondary schools or colleges.
 

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Contents

Scientific literacy and science in the news
1
Scientific literacy and science in the news
5
What has science in the news to offer teachers and learners?
7
The Newsroom Project
13
And finally
14
What is news? What is science news?
16
News values
18
News values as constructions
21
Using the news to teach about science content and enquiry
96
teaching approaches and learning experiences
101
hot air rises
107
chewing gum
110
brushing teeth
113
And finally
118
Using the news to teach about science and society
119
Decision making in socioscientific contexts
121

What is science news?
22
Science in the news and scientific literacy
26
And finally
30
News production science news production
32
Constraints that apply in news production
34
Codes and conventions
37
Sources journalists use
45
The language of news or boffins beware
47
Values and viewpoints
48
Values viewpoints and science reporting
51
And finally
52
News reception science news reception
53
Do we remember what we see hear or read?
56
Are we affected by what we see hear or read?
57
Current models of news reception in relation to socioscientific issues
61
Enhancing our interpretative repertoires
64
And finally
65
What research tells us about news and science education
66
News in the science curriculum
67
News in the science classroom
69
Young people reading sciencerelated news reports
72
Young people reading sciencerelated news reports in instructional settings
79
And finally
81
Thinking about aims articles and activities
83
Selection of aims for sciencerelated news work
84
Learning outcomes associated with scientific literacy including lifelong learning
86
Selection of articles for sciencerelated news work
91
And finally
94
Science in the news and citizenship education
124
Teaching approaches and learning experiences
125
air pollution
127
the GM debate
130
fortifying food with folic acid
135
And finally
140
Teaching about science in the news
142
Sciencerelated stories are prevalent in the news
143
They are produced for particular purposes
146
All have embedded values and viewpoints
148
Significant science news stories call for a critical reflective response
154
And finally
159
Working together to ensure science in the news a place in the curriculum
160
A permanent place in the curriculum for science in the news
161
Collaboration across the curriculum
162
Approaches to collaboration
164
A science in the news project day
171
And finally
176
Appendix 1
178
Appendix 2
179
Appendix 3
181
Appendix 4
183
Appendix 5
185
Appendix 6
187
Appendix 7
190
References and further reading
192
Index
205
Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 194 - DeBoer, GE (2000). Scientific literacy: Another look at its historical and contemporary meanings and its relationship to science education reform.
Page 197 - To trust or not to trust, ..." - pupils' ways of judging information encountered in a socio-scientific issue. International Journal of Science Education. 23(9), 877-901.
Page 193 - J. (2000). Evaluating media-enhancement and source authority on the Internet: the knowledge integration environment.

About the author (2007)

Ruth Jarman is a lecturer in science education at the Graduate School of Education, Queen s University Belfast where she contributes to its programmes of initial teacher training and continuing professional development. Prior to this she was an inspector of schools with the Department of Education Northern Ireland. She taught science in the secondary sector for a number of years. Her research interests include the science curriculum and learning in science in formal and informal contexts.

Billy McClune is a lecturer in science education at the Graduate School of Education, Queen s University Belfast where he coordinates the physics and chemistry courses within the PGCE programme and contributes to the continuing professional development programme. Prior to this he was head of science having taught physics in a number of schools in Northern Ireland. He also worked as a field officer with a science curriculum development project and with a local Education and Library Board. His research interests include science curriculum development, physics education, teacher education and educational management.

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