Developing Through Relationships

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University of Chicago Press, Aug 1, 1993 - Psychology - 230 pages
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This accessible book explains how individuals develop through their relationships with others. Alan Fogel demonstrates that human development is driven by a social dynamic process called co-regulation—the creative interaction of individuals to achieve a common goal. He focuses on communication—between adults, between parents and children, among non-human animals, and even among cells and genes—to create an original model of human development.

Fogel explores the origins of communication, personal identity, and cultural participation and argues that from birth communication, self, and culture are inseparable. He shows that the ability to participate as a human being in the world does not come about only with the acquisition of language, as many scholars have thought, but begins during an infant's earliest nonverbal period. According to Fogel, the human mind and sense of self start to develop at birth through communication and relationships between individuals.

Fogel weaves together theory and research from a variety of disciplines, including psychology, biology, linguistics, philosophy, anthropology, and cognitive science. He rejects the objectivist perspective on development in favor of a relational perspective: to treat the mind as an objective, mechanical thing, Fogel contends, is to ignore the interactive character of thinking. He argues that the life of the mind is a dialogue between imagined points of view, like a dialogue between two different people, and he uses this view to explain his relational theory of human development.

Developing through Relationships makes a substantial contribution not only to developmental psychology but also to the fields of communication, cognitive science, linguistics, and biology.
 

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Contents

Introduction and perspective
4
Relational perspective
5
Developmental perspective
6
Cultural perspective
7
About this book
8
The origins of communication self and culture
11
Guiding principles
12
Communication self and culture in infancy
16
Processes of selforganization within relationships
103
A dynamic model of consensual framing in relationships
106
The formation of differences between relationships
110
Two patterns of relationship formation
115
The self in relation embodied cognition
120
Participatory cognition
123
Imaginative cognition
126
Infant cognition and its development
129

Proposals for a relational perspective on infant development
25
The communication system coregulation and framing
27
Coregulation
30
Consensual frames
37
The communication system history and metaphor
44
Systems and interdependence
45
Metaphors in social and developmental psychology
53
The fundamental problem of beinginrelation
61
A model of communication meaning and information
65
Information in continuous process communication systems
72
The formation of relationships creating new meaning
86
Creativity in relationships
90
Conclusions
98
The formation of relationships differences between dyads
102
The self in relation self and other
140
The dialogical self in adults
141
The dialogical self in infancy
143
The dialogical self is coregulated
154
Culture as communication stability and change
161
Culture and infancy
164
Conclusions and implications
178
morality aesthetics and affiliation
181
Research approaches to relationship development
188
Bibliography
194
General index
223
Name index
226
Copyright

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Page 196 - Brachfield, S., Goldberg, S., & Sloman, J. (1980). Parent-infant interaction in free play at 8 and 12 months: Effects of prematurity and immaturity.

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