Deviance: The Interactionist Perspective

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Earl Rubington, Martin S. Weinberg
Allyn and Bacon, 1999 - Social Science - 448 pages
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This highly successful reader presents the interactionist approach to the study of deviance, examining deviance as a social phenomenon that consists of a set of interpretations and social reactions. The first half of the book (Parts I and II) deals with how people define some persons as deviant and act on the basis of these designations. The second half of the book (Parts III and IV) discusses the deviants themselves: how they respond to being typed by others, how they type themselves, and how deviant groups are formed. Readings new to the ninth edition include: Five new readings in Part I, "The Social Deviant," include the work of Heckert and Best, Cahill and Eggleston, Logan, Dellinger and Williams, and Kenney. Three new readings in Part III, "Relations among Deviants," include Miller, Anderson and Dabney, and Hollinger. Two new selections in Chapter 12, "Deviant Identity" highlight the contributions of McLorgand Taub, and Irwin.

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Contents

PART
1
THE PROCESS OF SOCIAL TYPING
7
THE CULTURAL CONTEXT
30
Copyright

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