Dial M for Merde: A Novel

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Open Road Media, Mar 20, 2012 - Fiction - 316 pages
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Bemused Brit Paul West steps in it once again when a romantic getaway to the south of France is spoiled by international intrigue When the glorious oceanographer Gloria Monday convinces Paul West to travel to the swank beaches of southern France—where she’s investigating caviar-smuggling cartels—he assumes he’s about to have the time of his life. But for West, France has always been full of surprises underfoot, and this trip is no exception to the rule. He’s soon dragged into an undercover investigation that goes all the way to the top and leaves him feeling sometimes like James Bond, sometimes like Inspector Clouseau. Dial M for Merde is a comic caper that pokes fun at French society at every level, from pompous politicians to grumpy waitstaff.
 

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User Review  - MarthaJeanne - LibraryThing

A really funny story of the dangers of travelling in France. Sex, suspense, food, wine, politics, class warfare, even carbon footprints and sturgeons: This book has it all, but all of it could only ... Read full review

Contents

The Pitch
1
2
3
5
6
7
8
2
3
5
1
2
3
Epilogue
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Stephen Clarke (b. 1958) is the bestselling author of seven books of fiction and nonfiction that satirize the peculiarities of French culture. Born in St. Albans, England, Clarke studied French and German at Oxford University. After graduating, he took a number of odd jobs, including teaching English to French businessmen. In 2004, he self-published A Year in the Merde, a comic novel skewering contemporary French society. The novel was an instant success and has led to numerous follow-ups, including Dial M for Merde (2008), 1,000 Years of Annoying the French (2010), and Paris Revealed (2011). After working as a journalist for a French press group for ten years, Paris-based Clarke now has a regular spot on French cable TV, poking fun at French culture. 

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