Dialectic and Dialogue

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Stanford University Press, Jun 11, 2010 - Philosophy - 169 pages
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This book considers the emergence of dialectic out of the spirit of dialogue and traces the relation between the two. It moves from Plato, for whom dialectic is necessary to destroy incorrect theses and attain thinkable being, to Cusanus, to modern philosophers Descartes, Kant, Hegel, Schleiermacher and Gadamer, for whom dialectic becomes the driving force behind the constitution of a rational philosophical system. Conceived as a logical enterprise, dialectic strives to liberate itself from dialogue, which it views as merely accidental and even disruptive of thought, in order to become a systematic or scientific method. The Cartesian autonomous and universal yet utterly monological and lonely subject requires dialectic alone to reason correctly, yet dialogue, despite its unfinalizable and interruptive nature, is what constitutes the human condition.
 

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Contents

Dialogue and Dialectic in Plato
1
Via Antiqua
23
Via Moderna
48
A Systematic Outlook
72
Interruption
95
6 Against Writing
119
Dialectical Conclusion
153
Notes
157
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About the author (2010)

Dmitri Nikulin is Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research in New York. His most recent books are Matter, Imagination and Geometry: Ontology, Natural Philosophy and Mathematics in Plotinus, Proclus, and Descartes (2002), and On Dialogue (2006).

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