Dialog Theory for Critical Argumentation

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John Benjamins Publishing, 2007 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 307 pages
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Because of the need to devise systems for electronic communication on the internet, multi-agent computing is moving to a model of communication as a structured conversation between rational agents. For example, in multi-agent systems, an electronic agent searches around the internet, and collects certain kinds of information by asking questions to other agents. Such agents also reason with each other when they engage in negotiation and persuasion. It is shown in this book that critical argumentation is best represented in this framework by the model of reasoned argument called a dialog, in which two or more parties engage in a polite and orderly exchange with each other according to rules governed by conversation policies. In such dialog argumentation, the two parties reason together by taking turns asking questions, offering replies, and offering reasons to support a claim. They try to settle their disagreements by an orderly conversational exchange that is partly adversarial and partly collaborative.
 

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Well thought out and an excellent read on the subject.

Contents

CHAPTER
1
The rebirth of dialog theory
2
CHAPTER
3
Dialog theory in computing
10
Agent communication
15
Fundamental concepts of dialog theory
20
The critical discussion as a type of dialog
25
Plan recognition and deliberation
29
Sincerity conditions
145
Understanding of messages
148
Rational effects of a message
151
Future multiagent systems and dialog theory
153
chapter 5
159
The case of the critical discussion on euthanasia
160
Fallacy and deception
164
Current systems of formal dialectic
167

The BDI model and the commitment model
34
The problem of retraction
36
Communication and information
40
The future and past of dialog theory
43
chapter 2
45
Origins of dialectic in ancient philosophy
48
The dialectic of Socrates and Plato
51
Aristotelian dialectic
56
Aristotles classification of types of dialog
62
Medieval dialectic
65
Dialectic in modern philosophy
68
The reappearance of dialectic
71
Eight characteristics of dialectic
74
Hamblins dialog rules
79
Functions of questioning and asserting
82
The future of dialectic as a subject
86
Persuasion dialog
89
Persuasion in rhetoric and dialectic
90
Characteristics of persuasion dialog
95
Defeasibility and acceptance
101
Evidence testing and burden of proof
106
Dialogs truth and relativism
110
The charge of pernicious relativism
112
Judging the maieutic depth of a persuasion dialog
116
Aiming at the truth
121
Truth evidence and acceptance
124
Conclusions
127
chapter 4
131
Agent communication systems
132
Speech acts
137
Interrogative messages in ACLs
140
Conversation policies
143
Implicit commitment and Gricean implicature
173
Adding speech acts and agents to formal dialectic
176
What characteristics of an agent are needed?
180
Expectations and plausible inference
185
Plans strategies and chaining forward
187
Strategies in formal dialectic
191
Qualities of character for agents in formal dialectic
200
Dialectical shifts and embeddings
205
Dialectical shifts and fallacies
206
The problem of shifts and embeddings
212
Cases of shifts based on embeddings
216
Cases of shifts not based on embeddings
221
Argumentation schemes
226
Analysis of the cases based on embeddings
230
Analysis of the cases not based on embeddings
233
Fitting dialogs together at global and local levels
235
Metadialogs
239
Solving the embedding problem
241
chapter 7
247
Explanation clarification and interpretation
248
The three stages of critical assessment
253
Plan recognition and incomplete arguments
256
New tools for argument diagramming
261
The problem of enthymemes
265
Three bases for the enthymeme
268
Textual interpretation as an abductive process
274
Textual interpretation as simulative
277
Anticipating an arguers future moves
281
The problem of diffuse dialog
285
Bibliography
289
Index
303
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