Dialogue Interpreting in Mental Health

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Rodopi, 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 293 pages
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In this era of globalisation, the use of interpreters is becoming increasingly important in business meetings and negotiations, government and non-government organisations, health care and public service in general. This book focuses specifically on the involvement of interpreters in mental health sessions. It offers a theoretical foundation to aid the understanding of the role-issues at stake for both interpreters and therapists in this kind of dialogue. In addition to this, the study relies on the detailed analysis of a corpus of videotaped therapy sessions. The theoretical foundation is thus linked to what actually takes place in this type of talk. Conclusions are then drawn about the feasibility and desirability of certain discussion techniques. Dialogue Interpreting in Mental Health offers insight into the processes at work when two people talk with the help of an interpreter and will be of value to linguists specialising in intercultural communication, health care professionals, interpreters and anyone working in multilingual situations who already uses or is planning to use an interpreter.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgements
1
dialogue interpreting in mental
11
The research design
17
The interviews and the statements
33
The concept map interpreting in mental health care43
43
Models of cooperation between therapist
75
Introduction to the analysis
95
The management of the session
111
The translation of psychotherapeutic sessions
145
Communication problems in interpretermediated
193
Discussion
237
Conclusions
249
References
259
Summary in English
289
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Hanneke Bot is a sociologist and a Dutch government registered psychotherapist. She works with interpreters on a daily basis in the clinical treatment of patients from different lingual backgrounds. In addition to her clinical work, she has worked on this research project in affiliation with the Institute of Linguistics, University of Utrecht in the Netherlands. She has published widely about this subject both in the Netherlands and internationally.

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