Diary: Alone on Earth

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eBookIt.com, May 22, 2013 - Fiction - 161 pages
2 Reviews
David, the narrator of "Diary: Alone on Earth," is a loner, but he is yet to discover what true loneliness feels like. David suffered a great tragedy in life, so he has decided to cut himself completely loose from all those who love him. This man now feels safe inside his comfort shell, having abandoned friends, family for a hermit lifestyle in a tiny Alabama town. But his world is turned upside down on one particular day: November 16, 2016. An intermittent humming noise is emitted throughout the entire world. No one seems to understand from where it is originating. Russia suspects the United States is up to something, and is threatening war. India has suddenly invaded Pakistan due to their age-old hatred. Droves of people are committing suicide throughout the world. President Obama has put the U.S. Military at Defcon 3. Animals, particularly birds, are very hard hit by this humming noise. All the talking heads on the news channels are describing the day's bizarre events. That night, David goes to sleep with his beloved beagle, Ralph, at the foot of his bed. They both feel a little sick, both hope the humming noise is past them. David thinks tomorrow it will all have blown over.
He is wrong.
 

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It's normal to wonder what it would be like to be the last person on earth. That is, until it actually happens.
David is a senior citizen who has reasons for wanting to cut himself off from the
rest of the world. He finds an isolated house outside of a small town in Alabama, where he plans to spend the rest of his days with his faithful dog, Ralph. One day, the whole world is menaced a strange humming sound. The media is full of speculation as to the cause. Several hundred people are driven to suicide, including one of David's neighbors. Countries are ready for war, convinced that their "enemy" is about to attack. David goes to bed.
The next morning David wakes up to no electricity, and no battery power, either. Even new, freshly charged batteries are dead. David travels to the houses of his neighbors, to find them deserted. He visits the small town, a place called Axis, to find it also deserted. He finds a motorcycle that he can push start, and visits Mobile, Alabama. He finds hundreds and hundreds of abandoned, burning cars, like people were in a panic. But there are no people, not even dead bodies. He finds the same thing in Atlanta, along with signs that people tried very hard keep something out, or in.
The book turns into something of a psychological battle between David and a being that he calls The Blackness. David feels that it wants him dead, but it can't kill him, so it torments him constantly. David hears Ralph barking, but no matter how much he calls out to Ralph, he doesn't come. David also hears voices that he should recognize. David and The Blackness meet late in the book (think "demon from hell"). David decides to travel west to keep looking for any other people. For some reason, he feels that answers will be found at the end of Interstate 90, in the town of Van Horn, Texas. As he travels, with The Blackness making it as hard as possible, David has to maneuver around thousands and thousands of smashed and burning cars, but still no people. Does David reach the end of his journey? Does he discover what happened to mankind?
Told all in diary form, this is a really interesting suspense story. It does a very good job of showing the despair that will set in after the "novelty" wears off, including the wondering if God would really let such a thing happen to His people. It is very much worth reading.
 

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About the author (2013)

I am a retired federal worker who is finally realizing his lifelong passion, writing. I am a first time author and have finished my first novel (Diary: Alone on Earth) and a few short stories that intend to get published. I started this entire novel on a blog just for my own amusement. That soon became a vast following by people who strongly urged me to get this story published.

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