Diary of a Mad Puerto Rican

Front Cover
AuthorHouse, Apr 10, 2007 - Psychology - 136 pages
1 Review
This book is the true story of a young man who loses his innocense in the war of Vietnam and his battle to overcome his many problems after the war. Three parts. His Childhood, His time in the Army and His life after the war. Filled with dozens of photographs of actual events  places and people.

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Review written by Bernie Weisz,Historian and book reviewer, Vietnam War Pembroke Pines,FL USA Contact: BernWei1@aol.com Title of Review: "Going to War to "Catch A Buzz"!, Angel C. Rivera's book, "Diary of a Mad Puerto Rican" at first glance seemed to me to be both very intriguing and interesting. The book announces on the back dust jacket that "Diary of a Mad Puerto Rican" is the true story of Angel C. Rivera. Three parts of the life of an innocent young man who lost his soul and sanity in Vietnam as an assassin for the U.S. Army. Later, he gradually loses everything else from the unknown mental, emotional, and physical damage he has suffered". Then, the book states that Rivera was exposed to "military drug experiments" in Vietnam. are also claims that Rivera is the victim of Government negligence in helping him with his problems. Furthermore, he was exposed to Agent Orange and was denied help. In addition, the book announces that Rivera is: "caught in the middle of the prejudice and injustice of life in America" I am sorry to say that this book did not deliver on any of these premises. First, I know that the United States, in particular, the C.I.A. conducted experiments with unwitting G.I.'s in regard to the incapacitating effects of L.S.D. Initially thought to be the perfect incapacitating agent, L.S.D. sprayed via a covert air assault on an unwitting population was thought incorrectly to be the perfect agent to temporarily incapacitate a targeted populace while an opposing army could take over. The theory was that buildings would be left intact, and as opposed to a nuclear device, there would be none, if any casualties.
Angel C. Rivera's book, "Diary of a Mad Puerto Rican" at first glance seemed to me to be both very intriguing and interesting. The book announces on the back dust jacket that "Diary of a Mad Puerto Rican" is the true story of Angel C. Rivera. Three parts of the life of an innocent young man who lost his soul and sanity in Vietnam as an assassin for the U.S. Army. Later, he gradually loses everything else from the unknown mental, emotional, and physical damage he has suffered". Then, the book states that Rivera was exposed to "military drug experiments" in Vietnam. There are also claims that Rivera is the victim of Government negligence in helping him with his problems. Furthermore, he was exposed to Agent Orange and was denied help. In addition, the book announces that Rivera is: "caught in the middle of the prejudice and injustice of life in America" I am sorry to say that this book did not deliver on any of these premises. First, I know that the United States, in particular, the C.I.A. conducted experiments with unwitting G.I.'s in regard to the incapacitating effects of L.S.D. Initially thought to be the perfect incapacitating agent, L.S.D. sprayed via a covert air assault on an unwitting population was thought incorrectly to be the perfect agent to temporarily incapacitate a targeted populace while an opposing army could take over. The theory was that buildings would be left intact, and as opposed to a nuclear device, there would be none, if any casualties.The only drg tests Angel had in Vietnam was on himself!
 

Other editions - View all

About the author (2007)

Angel C. Rivera was born in Coamo Puerto Rico. He spent most of his life trsaveling all over the United States and overseas with his family because his father was in the Army. He joined the U.S. Army in October 1968, went to Vietnam and got out of the Army in 1971. He decided to write this book to try to understand what was going on in his head and to let people into the mind of a combat soldiers sadness, sorrow and pain.

Bibliographic information