Dictionary of bioinformatics and computational biology

Front Cover
Wiley-Liss, 2004 - Computers - 636 pages
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Recent developments in molecular biology, genomics, proteomics, and other areas have produced a wealth of experimental data on sequences and three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules. As a result, the employment of various computational methods of analysis to obtain useful information is now a major new discipline: bioinformatics.
The Dictionary of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology provides a vital reference for important terms, offering students and researchers a convenient summary of the core knowledge of the field. With concise and accurate definitions of over 600 words, phrases, and concepts, this volume:
* Offers thorough A-Z coverage
* Lists references and Internet links
* Incorporates cross-referencing throughout
* Features a comprehensive index of topics
Anyone working in basic sciences and clinical research today will find the Dictionary of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology to be an essential companion.

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Contents

Ab Initio
3
After Sphere
9
X
12
Alignment of Nucleic Acid Sequences
15
Amino Acid
21
Before State Before Sphere
43
BLAST
49
Boltzmann Factor
55
Linkage Disequilibrium Analysis
297
LUCA
302
Map Function
308
MatInspector
315
Metabonome
321
Microarray Profiling of Gene
327
NDB
360
Neutral Theory
367

Ga Calpha
61
Chimeric DNA Sequence
67
Conservation
93
CpG Island
99
D
107
Decision Tree
113
XX
126
EBI
135
EMBnet
141
Empirical Potential Energy Function
145
Entropy
151
Evolution
158
Expression Profiler
164
FASTA
170
Fold Library
176
Gametic Phase Disequilibrium
185
Gene Expression Domain
191
Gene Prediction Accuracy
201
Generalization
207
Genetic Drift
209
Genome Size
215
GOBO
221
I
251
Independent Variable
257
InterPro
263
IUPACIUB Codes
269
L
285
Last Universal Common Ancestor
291
Open Reading Frame
379
Peptide
393
PHRAP
398
Phylogenomics
406
Polypeptide
412
Predictive Power
418
Read
456
Regulatory Sequence
463
Ribosomal RNA
469
RNA Splicing
475
Robustness
483
SCWRL
495
SelfOrganizing Map
501
Sequence of Proteins
509
LETTER CONTENTS
511
Shannon Uncertainty
517
SmithWaterman Algorithm
523
SRS
529
THEATRE
556
TRANSFAC
562
Tree Puzzle
568
V
579
VISTA
585
Weight Matrix
592
XML
598
Synonym List
605
Index of Entries
625
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Dr. John Hancock received his PhD from the University of Edinburgh in 1980. He subsequently undertook postdoctoral training at the Max-Planck-Institut für molekulare Genetik in Berlin, Imperial College, London and the University of Cambridge before taking up a Research Fellowship at the Research school of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra. On returning to the UK in 1994 he took up a group leader post at the MRC’s Clinical Sciences Centre and was subsequently Reader in Computational Biology in the Computer Science Department at Royal Holloway University of London. In 2002 he took up the post of Head of Bioinformatics at the MRC’s Mammalian Genetics Unit. He has made contributions in a number of areas of biochemistry and bioinformatics, but is perhaps best known for his work on RNA secondary structure evolution and the role of simple sequences in gene and genome evolution.

Dr. Marketa J. Zvelebil obtained her PhD at Birkbeck College, University of London, under the supervision of Dr. Michael Sternberg, then worked for 2 years with Dr. Sternberg at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund (now Cancer Research UK). She then joined Professor Janet Thornton at her newly created Biomolecular Structure and Modelling Group at University College London, where she worked for 3 years before moving to the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research to serve as group leader in Bio- and Proteoinformatics. She holds a lectureship position at University College London. Her current research involves analytical and structural studies of domains involved in signalling, protein modeling, and drug/ligand binding and design. Her latest interest is in the use of systems biology to model and analyze various signalling pathways.

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