Dictionary of Manufactures, Mining Machinery, and the Industrial Arts

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Daldy, Isbister, & Company, 1876 - 446 pages
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Page 296 - ... little more remains for man to do than to attend and watch this unconscious agent in its operations. The machine is then merely supplied with paper ; itself places the form, inks it, adjusts the paper to the form newly inked, stamps the sheet, and gives it forth to the hands' of the attendant, at the same time withdrawing the form for a fresh coat of ink, which itself again distributes, to meet the ensuing sheet, now advancing for impression : and the whole of these complicated acts are performed...
Page 205 - French first-order oil dioptric revolving light was very marked : indeed, the one may be said to put the other out. But the most beautiful feature of the electric was the extraordinary beam it gave. It shone night after night, large, steady, and lustrous as a planet, and you could see in the darkness a beam passing as far as the eye could see. From the tower, with the light at our back, it was very marked, and quite lit the hills round Paris. The whole horizon in the plane of the light showed the...
Page 407 - In the jurors' report on the Exhibition of 18J2, the following allusion is made to Scotch manufacturers : " To the Scotch manufacturen belong the credit of having found out what the public like, and of having led for a considerable period the public taste. So largely have their productions been imitated on the continent that many of the choicest fancy trouserings of France and other countries are easily traceable in design and coloring to their Scotch origin.
Page 262 - It was found that by stopping the end of a pipe it could be made to sound an octave lower than an open pipe of the same length...
Page 255 - ... the pressure of which turns the rowel so as to bring the next figure in its place, and at the same time inks itself from a small inking apparatus fixed above the figures. Thus, with six rowels, numbers 1 to 999,999 may be impressed, the first of the series appearing 000,001. This instrument may also be used dry for stamping anything where colour is not needed, but only an impression ; or with common marking-ink for stamping bales or goods of wooden packingcases. For printing, eight rowels with...
Page 255 - The figure is changed by the action of a small lever that rises up by the wooden handle, the pressure of which turns the rowel so as to bring the next figure in its place, and at the same time inks itself from a small inking apparatus fixed above the figures. Thus, with six rowels, numbers 1 to 999,999 may be impressed, the first of the series appearing 000,001. This instrument may also be used dry for stamping anything where colour is not needed, but only an impression ; or with common marking-ink...
Page 407 - The different sorts of letter most frequently used, are : black letter, great primer, english, pica, small pica, long primer, bourgeois, brevier, minion, nonpareil, pearl, and diamond.
Page 254 - The h:md instrument consists of a rowel-formed circle, on the points of which are cut in steel the ten numerals. It turns on an axle which may hold from two to six or more of these rowels. The figure, or figures that are to move are left free ; those that are stationary are fixed by a screw at the side to prevent their being disturbed by the action of the others. The figure is changed by the action of a small lever that rises...
Page 136 - ... bars, but when the objects get shorter and of more complex figures, the open fire or ordinary smith's hearth is employed. This, when of the largest kind, is a trough or pit of brickwork about six feet square, elevated only about six inches from the ground ; the one side of the hearth is extended into a vertical wall leading to the chimney, the lower end of which terminates in a hood usually of stout plate iron, which serves to collect the smoke from the fire. The back wall of the forge is fitted...
Page 318 - A substance formed by the union of an acid with an alkali, an earth, or a metallic oxide, in such proportions as to saturate both the base and the acid. Nitrates. Salts formed by the combination of any base with nitric acid. Nitrogen. A simple substance, by the French chemists called azote. It enters into a variety of compounds, and forms more than three parts in four of atmospheric air.

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