Die Musikkultur Altisraels/Palästinas: Studien zu archäologischen, schriftlichen und vergleichenden Quellen

Front Cover
Saint-Paul, 1999 - History - 388 pages
0 Reviews
"Music in ancient Israel/Palestine is discussed from its documented beginnings in the Stone Age (c. 10,000 B.C.) to the late Roman period (4th cent. CE). The study considers archaeology as the primary source of investigation; all other sources - written (mainly Biblical texts), comparative anthropological/ethnological, sociological, linguistic etc. - are discussed against the background of the material evidence. Since no reliable musical texts are known, musical analysis must concentrate on sound producing tools, i.e., musical instruments. This approach results in a re-consideration of accepted opinions and in new interpretations. For example, the musical instrument of the socio-clerical elite was the lyre, not the harp; the musical splendor of the Second Temple seems to be mainly a later glorification legend; the local musical culture appears as a mosaic of many musical traditions (Philistine, Phoenician, Israel/Judean, Nabataean, Samaritan, Idumeans, Dionysian, etc.), some of them ignored until now. While the musical tradition of the Stone Age had remained rather stable for a long time, the 4th millennium B.C. brought about the Acoustic-Organological Revolution: the establishment of the basic ancient instrumentary, increasingly exposed form now on to adaptation and change, generated a new musical reality. As musical life in ancient Israel/Palestine developed in a complex ethno-and socio-historical arena, an autochthonous and generally homogenous Near Eastern musical culture broke up into numerous heterogeneous musical styles corresponding to various ethnical, social and cultic sub-systems. The resulting musical ambience was characterized by the co-existence, and sometimes fusion, of extremely polarized tendencies, the archaic-obsolete and the contemporary-modern."--Summary.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Geographische chronologische und kulturelle Grenzen
10
Musikhistorische Aspekte
16
Die biblischen Musikinstrumente
32
VIII
33
Die Steinzeit 12 Jt 3200 v Chr
65
Die Bronzezeit 32001200 v Chr
77
Das Lautenspiel
83
Musik bei Symposiumszenen
90
Die hellenistischrömische Zeit 4 Jh v Chr 4 Jh n Chr
145
Musik im nabatäischsafaitischen Kulturkreis
155
Das Musikinstrumentarium der professionellen Moderne
164
Die Musik des DionysosKults
177
Das Musikinstrumentarium im samaritanischen Bereich
192
Das Musikinstrument als Kult Staats und Identitätssymbol
201
Klang und Ritualgerät Glaubens
209
Tafeln Nr 1 u 2
220

Instrument der Priester?
98
Die Eisenzeit 1200587 v Chr
103
Von den heiligen DoppelrohrBläserinnen zu DoppelrohrSpielern
111
Musiker und Tänzer der philistäischen und phönizischen
131
Die Tritonshörner
137
Verzeichnis der Abbildungen 363
331
Abkürzungsverzeichnis 373
341
Literaturverzeichnis
375
Namen Begriff und Sachregister 415
383
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information