Die Design Handbook

Front Cover
David Alkire Smith
Society of Manufacturing Engineers, 1990 - Technology & Engineering - 928 pages
3 Reviews
Whether you're involved in a highly specialized operation, or need comprehensive information on many types of die designs, this book is your best bet book on how to design dies. Hundreds of illustrations on proven designs are included, as well as hundreds of tables and equations to help you make quick calculations for allowances, pressures, forces and more.
 

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World's greatest beginners for die makers handbook.

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very use full

Contents

STAMPINGS DESIGN
2-1
DIE ENGINEERINGPLANNING AND DESIGN
3-1
SHEAR ACTION IN METAL CUTTING
4-1
CUTTING DIES
5-1
BENDING OF METALS
6-1
BENDING DIES
7-1
METAL MOVEMENT IN FORMING
8-1
FORMING DIES
9-1
PROGRESSIVE DIES
17-1
COMPOUND AND COMBINATION DIES
18-1
DESIGNING PRESSTOOLS FOR FINEBLANKING
19-1
TOOLS FOR MULTIPLE SLIDE FORMING MACHINES
20-1
LOWCOST AND MISCELLANEOUS DIES
21-1
DIE SETS AND COMPONENTS
22-1
DESIGNING DIES FOR AUTOMATION
35
SECTION 24 DIE MAINTENANCE SETTING AND TRYOUT
27

DISPLACEMENT OF METAL IN DRAWING
9-69
PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT FOR DEEP DRAWING
11-1
DRAW DIES
12-1
DIES FOR LARGE AND IRREGULAR SHAPES
13-1
RUBBERPAD AND HYDRAULICACTION DIES
14-1
COMPRESSION DIES
15-1
SECTION 16 PROGRESSIVE DIE DESIGN
16-1
LUBRICANTS FOR PRESSWORKING OPERATIONS
25-1
DIE PROTECTION SYSTEMS
26-1
PRESS DATA
27-1
FERROUS DIE MATERIALS
28-1
NONFERROUS AND NONMETALLIC DIE MATERIALS
29-1
INDEX
I-1
Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 1-9 - Distance from the top of the bed to the bottom of the slide with the stroke down and adjustment up. In general, the shut height of a press is the maximum die height that can be accommodated for normal operation, taking the bolster thickness and any fillers into consideration.
Page 1-1 - Carburizing — A process that introduces carbon into a solid ferrous alloy by heating the metal in contact with a carbonaceous material — solid, liquid or gas — to a temperature above the transformation range and holding at that temperature. Carburizing is generally followed by quenching to produce a hardened case.
Page 1-1 - ... bending The straining of material, usually flat sheet or strip metal, by moving it around a straight axis which lies in the neutral plane. Metal flow takes place within the plastic range of the metal, so that the bent part retains a permanent set after removal of the applied stress. The cross section of the bend inward from the neutral plane is in compression; the rest of the bend is in tension.
Page 1-4 - In metal forming, a circular plate with a hole in the center contoured to fit a forming punch; used to support the blank during the forming cycle.
Page 1-3 - A casting made in a die. (2) A casting process where molten metal is forced under high pressure into the cavity of a metal mold. die clearance. Clearance between a mated punch and die; commonly expressed as clearance per side. Also called clearance, punch-to-die clearance. die cushion. A press accessory located beneath or within a bolster or die block to provide an additional motion or pressure for stamping operations; actuated by air, oil, rubber or springs, or by a combination thereof. die forging....
Page 2-23 - In designing stampings with punched holes, it is well to. take into account the fact that only about one-half the thickness of the metal is sheared cleanly to the size of the punch. The rest is torn out by the pressure exerted on the sheared slug. This produces a rough hole tapering in diameter to the size of the punch plus about 10% of the metal thickness (see Figure 6B-1).
Page 2-25 - ... embossment much larger than the hole, then by successive steps forming the desired flange, and finally punching out the hole. This method increases costs and its use should be limited. One way of accomplishing this is to keep the specified flange width at an absolute minimum at all times. A...

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About the author (1990)

DAVID A. SMITH is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, University of California, Irvine.

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