Diemaking and die design: a treatise on the design and practical application of different classes of dies for blanking, bending, forming and drawing sheet-metal parts, including modern diemaking practice and funamental principles of die construction

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Franklin Day Jones
The Industrial press, 1915 - House & Home - 339 pages
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Page 174 - The amount y that a rectangular part can be reduced between draws depends upon the corner radius and diminishes as the corner radius becomes smaller. For instance, a box with corners of | inch radius could not be reduced as much as one with corners of |- inch radius. To obtain the total amount of reduction or 2 y, multiply the corner radius required for the drawn box by 3; then add the product to the width and length, thus obtaining the width and length of the preceding die. This rule should only...
Page 18 - The blank-holder presses against the cup and prevents the formation of wrinkles while the punch draws it into a deeper shape of less diameter. These dies, especially when used for large work, are frequently made of cast iron, treated in such a manner as to give a very dense and uniform texture to the metal at the working surfaces. Sometimes a steel ring is set into a cast-iron holder to form the drawing part of the die, and the blank-holder is made of a steel casting, which adds considerable to the...
Page 18 - Fig. 88, while the punch draws it into a deeper shape of less diameter. These drawing and redrawing dies are mostly made of a special grade of cast iron treated in such a manner as to give a very dense and uniform texture to the metal at the working surfaces. Sometimes...
Page 14 - ... inch in depth. Suggestions concerning a large variety of shapes and styles of work such as can be done in combination dies will be found on the following pages. Most combination -dies are so arranged that the finished article is automatically pushed out of the dies by the action of springs. With the press set on an incline, the finished work will therefore slide back by gravity, effecting a considerable saving in labor and greatly increasing the speed of production. An expert operator, with a...
Page 14 - ... inch deep, or for cutting and drawing burner and gas fixture parts, toys, etc., up to I inch in depth. Suggestions concerning a large variety of shapes and styles of work such as can be done in combination dies will be found on the following pages. Most combination -dies are so arranged that the finished article is automatically pushed out of the dies by the action of springs. With the press set on an incline, the finished work will therefore slide back by gravity, effecting a considerable saving...
Page 130 - ... allowance is made for a rounded corner at the bottom, or for trimming the shell after drawing. To allow for trimming, add the required amount to depth h. When a shell is of irregular cross-section, if its weight is known, the blank diameter can be determined by the following formula...
Page 175 - Illustrating Method of Determining Approximate Shape of Blanks for Drawn Rectangular Parts When laying out a blank by this method, first draw a plan view of the finished shell or lines representing the shape of the work at the bottom, the corners being given the required radius, as shown by the diagram A, Fig. 34. Next draw the...
Page 2 - ... which strips the stock off of the punch block as the latter ascends. The opening in the stripper plate conforms to the shape of the punch and is either slightly larger to provide a little clearance, or close fitting to steady the punch. Between the stripper plate and die-block there is a guide G, which serves to keep the stock in alignment with the die opening as it is fed along. This guide (which may be formed by planing a channel on the under side of the stripper) is made so that the space...

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