Diet in sickness and health

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Saunders, 1896 - 219 pages
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Page 62 - If we compare domestic life and manners in England with those of other countries where meat does not form such an integral article of diet, a notable improvement will be remarked. In less meat-eating France urbanity is the rule of the home; in...
Page 67 - Less nutriment, therefore, must be taken in proportion as age advances, or rather as activity diminishes, or the individual will suffer. If he continues to consume the same abundant breakfasts, substantial lunches, and heavy dinners, which at the summit of his power he could dispose of almost with impunity, he will in time certainly either accumulate fat, or become acquainted with gout or rheumatism, or show signs of unhealthy deposit of some kind in some part of the body, processes which must inevitably...
Page 67 - If he continues to consume the same abundant breakfasts, substantial lunches, and heavy dinners, which at the summit of his power he could dispose of almost with impunity, he will in time certainly either accumulate fat or become acquainted with gout or rheumatism, or show signs of unhealthy deposit of some kind in some part of the body, processes which must inevitably empoison, undermine, or shorten his remaining term of life. He must reduce his ' intake,' because a smaller expenditure is an enforced...
Page 69 - As one reads of the habits and life of these men and women, who attained to the age of one hundred years and more, one is struck by the fact that they were almost invariably lean people, of spare habit, and of great moderation in eating and drinking. Of thirtyseven three took no animal food, four took very little, twenty a little, ten a moderate amount, and only one acknowledged taking much meat. With regard to alcohol, the returns are much the same, and abstemiousness is found to be the rule of...
Page 67 - intake," because a smaller expenditure is an enforced condition of existence. At seventy the man's power has further diminished, and the nutriment must correspond thereto if he desires still another term of comfortable life. And why should he not ? Then at eighty, with less activity there must be still less
Page 79 - ... ounces of fruit, fresh preferred, for dessert. It is desirable at this meal to avoid taking fluids, but in hot weather, or in the absence of fruit, six to eight ounces of light wine may be taken.
Page 69 - I was fallen into different kinds of disorders, such as pains in my stomach, and often stitches, and spices of the gout ; attended by, what was still worse, an almost continual slow fever, a stomach generally out of order, and a perpetual thirst.
Page 79 - ... oz. of fruit, fresh preferred, for dessert. It is desirable at this meal to avoid taking fluids, but in hot weather, or in the absence of fruit, 6 to 8 oz. of light wine may . be taken. Afternoon. — The same amount of coffee or tea as in the morning, with at most 6 oz.
Page 32 - ... leaf. The first effect is sedative, rapidly followed by stimulation, in which the heart beats are quickened, the nervous system becomes more active, the intelligence more acute, and the muscles pass more easily into a state of contraction. Dr. Mantagazza says that when he was under the influence of coca he had an irresistible inclination to gymnastic exercise. The absence of the sense of hunger seems to be due not only to the...

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