Digital Games: Computers at Play

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Infobase Publishing, 2010 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 126 pages
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According to the Pew Internet and American Life Project, 97 percent of teenagers play video games, and 88 percent of 650 MIT freshman surveyed reported playing video games before the age of 10. Although the popularity of gaming runs through all demographics---from ages 9 to 90---the teen population is the primary group that spends many hours playing video games. Video games have come a long way since they were developed in the 1970s. In the past, game programs used a computer-like gadget that could be connected to the television. With the development of personal computers in the 1980s, the computer monitor became a more popular display device, leading to the new term computer game. These terms, along with digital game, are now interchangeable. Digital Games: Computers at Play explains the history of digital games, explores how the games have affected players and society, and discusses emerging trends in the digital games industry.

As each flashy, new gadget or software program debuts on the market, many people scramble to keep up with the latest technological developments. Designed to make life easier, faster, and better, the hype of these digital advances frequently overshadow the effects these convenient gadgets have on society. The Digital World explores how the creation and use of digital systems have forever changed the way we work, live, and communicate with one another.
 

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Contents

Preface
7
Acknowledgments
9
Making Computer Games
11
SinglePlayer Games
27
Multiplayer Games
40
Gaming Computers
53
Marketing Games
70
Games and Society
85
Chronology
100
Glossary
107
Bibliography
113
Further Resources
117
Picture Credits
121
Index
122
About the Author
126
Copyright

The Future of Digital Games
96

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About the author (2010)

Ananda Mitra, Ph.D., is the chair of the Department of Communication at Wake Forest University. He teaches courses on technology, popular culture, issues related to South Asia, and research methods. He has been a technology commentator for regional, national, and international media, such as Time magazine. Mitra has published articles in leading communications journals as well as two books.

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