Digital Hemlock: Internet Education and the Poisoning of Teaching

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UNSW Press, 2002 - Education - 222 pages
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University education is in crisis. Increasingly its funding is reduced and its relevancy questioned. The use of the Internet in university education and the delivery of online courses is seen as a cure-all, allowing tailored courses to be delivered to a wide student base with unprecedented immediacy and with a minimum of cost to the institution. Tara Brabazon questions these assumptions. She shows that the delivery of quality online education requires as much input and thought as conventional course delivery, and, although offered at minimal cost to the institution, it is the teachers who pay, in their own time and effort to maintain standards. She also shows that there is more to teaching and learning than can be delivered online.
 

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Contents

Do you want fries with that? Internet teaching and the administration of knowledge
3
Lets make lots of money Digital deals and trafficking truth in the virtual classroom
18
SURFING READING AND THINKING
43
Bonfire of the literacies and literacy in the information age
45
Double fold or double take? Book memory and the administration of information
73
TEACHERS AND TEACHING STUDENTS AND LEARNING
101
Reclaiming the teachers body
103
Point click and graduate Student motivation in the information age
128
WHO IS THE TARGET MARKET?
153
How Imagined are virtual communities?
155
Metatagging politics Social justice and the social responsibilities of universities
167
SOCRATES IN THE SOFTWARE
186
NOTES
196
INDEX
218
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Tara Brabazon is Professor of Media at the University of Brighton, Visiting Professor at Edge Hill's SOLSTICE CETL, and Fellow of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures & Commerce (RSA).

Previously, Tara has held academic positions in both Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand. An outstanding teacher, she won six teaching awards, including the Australian National Teaching Award for the Humanities in 1998, along with others in the areas of disability and cultural studies. In 2005, Tara won both the Murdoch University Postgraduate Supervisor of the Year and the Teaching Excellence Award. In 2009 and she won the University of Brighton's Teaching Excellence Award, nominated by both undergraduate and postgraduate students. She was a finalist for the 2005 Australian of the Year and also the 2005 Telstra Businesswoman of the Year in the Community Service category. In 1999 and 2002, she was short-listed for the Western Australian Citizen of the Year.

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