Dionysism and Comedy

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Rowman & Littlefield, 1999 - Drama - 293 pages
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This book investigates the idea of comic seriousness in Old Comedy. The issue has been a vexing one in classical studies, and the most traditional stance has been that Aristophanes' comedies reflect his personal ideology, reducing the plays to little more than political speeches. Riu concludes, in contrast, that we should abandon our preconceptions about comic seriousness and approach the language of Aristophanes with care and precision, alert to the nuances of meaning that the comic genre entails. Attempting to set Old Comedy in its proper context, Riu explores the myth and ritual of Dionysus in the city-state (including a reading of Euripides'Bacchae and other sources) and relates the patterns found in those myths to the works of Aristophanes. The book concludes with a section on the relationship between comedy and reality, the import of insults in comedy, comedy as ritual, the relationship between author and character, and the seriousness of comedy. With an appendix that examines the exceptional case ofClouds, Dionysism and Comedy is an important resource for students and scholars of classical comedy and the comedic genre
 

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Contents

IV
9
V
47
VI
51
VII
57
VIII
73
IX
85
X
111
XI
113
XIV
153
XV
163
XVI
209
XVIII
227
XIX
259
XX
269
XXI
283
XXII
292

XII
141

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Page vii - Gregory Nagy, General Editor Building on the foundations of scholarship within the disciplines of philology, philosophy, history, and archaeology, this series spans the continuum of Greek traditions extending from the second millennium BC to the present, not just the Archaic and Classical periods.

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About the author (1999)

Xavier Riu is associate professor in the department of Greek philology at the University of Barcelona.

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