Disaster Assistance: Federal State and Local Responses to Natural Disasters Need Improvement

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DIANE Publishing, May 1, 1991 - 101 pages
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Examines the Federal government's, particularly the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA), performance in responding to Hurricane Hugo and the Loma Prieta earthquake in 1989. Also reviews state and local governments' and voluntary relief agencies' activities in California, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Recommends improvements in disaster management. Includes Congressional testimony. Graphs and charts.
 

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Contents

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Page 81 - Mr. Chairman, this concludes my prepared statement. I would be happy to respond to any questions that you or Members of the Subcommittee may have.
Page 103 - Department of Agriculture Department of Commerce Department of Defense Department of Education Department of Energy Department of Health and Human Services Department of Housing and Urban Development...
Page 88 - US which, in the determination of the President, is or threatens to be of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant disaster assistance by the Federal Government under...
Page 12 - During September and October 1989, the United States experienced two of the worst natural disasters in its history — Hurricane Hugo and California's Loma Prieta earthquake. Hurricane Hugo was one of the most devastating and costly hurricanes ever to strike the United States and its territories. It struck the US Virgin Islands on September 17, 1989, with winds in excess of 140 miles per hour. The storm passed directly over St. Croix and Puerto Rico, and on September 22 it hit the coast of South...
Page 70 - General Services Administration Interstate Commerce Commission National Aeronautics and Space Administration National Aeronautics and Space...
Page 2 - Ranking Minority Member Subcommittee on VA, HUD, and Independent Agencies Committee on Appropriations United States Senate The Honorable...
Page 12 - ... devastating and costly hurricanes ever to strike the United States and its territories. It struck the US Virgin Islands on September 17, 1989, with winds in excess of 140 miles per hour. The storm passed directly over St. Croix and Puerto Rico, and on September 22 it hit the coast of South Carolina. It then continued through North Carolina. About a month later — on October 17, 1989 — the Loma Prieta earthquake struck northern California. It measured 7.1 on the Richter scale — the strongest...
Page 76 - Preparedness problems were linked to weaknesses in state and local programs, as well as in FEMA'S assistance and overall guidance. These problems included inadequate planning and training for recovery, low participation by elected officials in training and exercises, inadequate or no standard operating procedures for response and recovery activities, failure to correct problems identified during earlier training exercises, a limited number of staff having the necessary disaster assistance skills,...
Page 12 - The main shock lasted 7 to 10 seconds and was felt over a 400,000-square-mile area. Estimated damage of more than $6 billion was reported from Sacramento to Monterey, with severe damage in Alameda, San Francisco, and Santa Cruz counties. State and local emergency management agencies, as well as voluntary relief agencies, are expected to be the first agencies to respond to the needs caused by natural disasters. FEMA and other federal agencies supplement these efforts. Damage Caused by Hurricane Hugo...
Page 76 - FEHA has no practical means of requiring that they do so to be better prepared to deal with disasters. The preparedness, and thus the capability, of the five states we reviewed to respond to disasters varied. California, for example, had a large state emergency organization and state-funded training. In contrast, the Virgin Islands had one emergency planner and no state-funded training. California's level of preparedness contributed to its ability to respond to the earthquake with relatively few...

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