Discourses of Difference: An Analysis of Women's Travel Writing and Colonialism

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Psychology Press, 1993 - Literary Criticism - 232 pages
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This book provides a useful entry into the field of travel writing from a feminist perspective which combines Foucault with postcolonialist theory. The point of departure are the narratives produced by British women who, during the mid nineteenth to early twentieth century, traveled to colonized countries. Mills locates their narratives within larger structures of both material and symbolic power to stress the importance of the articulations of travel, gender and sexuality within travel culture: women paid attention to different things than men and had different expectations of themselves and of the `natives' while abroad. Much of this is familiar ground, but it is interesting to see how the author takes well-known female accounts such as Mary Kingsley's and reads them not as eccentric products but as part of a broader discourse about gender, colonialism, and travel experience.
 

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11/05/20
I read the introduction to this when I was writing my assignment on the approach I intend to use in my research. Mills is confident and knowledgeable about how to transpose Foucault's
primary ideas around power and historical curiosity into analysis of history. She is looking at this from a post-colonial, feminist perspective, I think her ideas are transferable to my own project.
One to read in full, at a later date, perhaps.
 

Contents

III
27
IV
47
V
67
VI
108
VII
125
IX
153
X
175
XII
195
XIII
200
XIV
213
XV
228
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Page 10 - I would like to show with precise examples that in analysing discourses themselves, one sees the loosening of the embrace, apparently so tight, of words and things, and the emergence of a group of rules proper to discursive practice. These rules define not the dumb existence of a reality, nor the canonical use of a vocabulary, but the ordering of objects.

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