Discovering Feminist Philosophy: Knowledge, Ethics, Politics

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2003 - Social Science - 157 pages
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Many people believe that gender equality has been achieved. In such a world, why dwell on the dualism between the sexes? Why separate, and therefore marginalize, women's scholarship from scholarship as a whole? In short, why feminist philosophy? Discovering Feminist Philosophy provides an accessible introduction to the central issues in feminist philosophy. At the same time, it answers current objections to feminism, arguing that in today's world it is as compelling as ever to probe the impact of the dualism of the sexes. Therefore, feminist perspectives make a vital contribution to the present and future of philosophy. Author Robin May Schott also contributes an original perspective on feminist ethics, based on her work on war and rape. This unique book is equal parts survey, viewpoint, and scholarship ideal for anyone seeking to understand the current and future role of feminist philosophy."
 

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Contents

Feminism and the History of Philosophy
25
Feminist Epistemologies
53
Feminist Ethics of Conflict
87
Transnational Feminism
135
Index
149
About the Author
157
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Page 9 - ... there is an absolute human type, the masculine. Woman has ovaries, a uterus; these peculiarities imprison her in her subjectivity, circumscribe her within the limits of her own nature. It is often said that she thinks with her glands. Man superbly ignores the fact that his anatomy also includes glands, such as the testicles, and that they secrete hormones. He thinks of his body as a direct and normal connection with the world, which he believes he apprehends objectively, whereas he regards the...
Page 9 - It amounts to this: just as for the ancients there was an absolute vertical with reference to which the oblique was defined, so there is an absolute human type, the masculine. Woman has ovaries, a uterus; these peculiarities imprison her in her subjectivity, circumscribe her w ithin the limits of her own nature.
Page 9 - Thus humanity is male and man defines woman not in herself but as relative to him; she is not regarded as an autonomous being.

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About the author (2003)

Robin May Schott is director for the NOS-H project, 'Sexuality, Death and the Feminine: Feminist Philosophical Analysis' at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. Discovering Feminist Philosophy is her fourth book.

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