Discussions in Education, Volume 1

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H. Holt, 1898 - Education - 342 pages
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Page 145 - There is now no place, or only a most uncomfortable one, for those boys who are strong in perception, apt in manipulation and correct in the interpretation of phenomena, but who are not good at memorizing or rehearsing the opinions and statements of others; or who, by their diffidence or slowness of speech, are unfitted for ordinary intellectual gymnastics.
Page 283 - ... which intimates the opinion that the athleticism of to-day is only a reaction after the former total neglect of gymnastics or a mere passing passion among our youth. But, if we concede that these exercises and contests are to hold their place in American life, is there no stopping-place, no point at which college authorities or the young men themselves, on their own motion, in their own discretion, for their own good, can say, " Thus far and no farther
Page 25 - Parsons Cooke, in addressing a body of students at Harvard recently, said : " When advocating in our mother university of Cambridge, in Old England, the claims of scientific culture, I was pushed with an argument which had very great weight with the eminent English scholars present, and which, you will be surprised to learn, was regarded as fatal to the success of the natural science triposes then under debate. The argument was, that the experimental sciences could not be made the subjects of competitive...
Page 262 - The golden age of English oratory, which extends over the last quarter of the eighteenth and the first quarter of the nineteenth centuries, produced no speaker, either in Parliament or at the Bar, superior in persuasive force and artistic finish to Thomas Lord Erskine.
Page 104 - The rise and growth of rationalism seems of this kind, 252 the scientific spirit, the desire to prove all things, and to hold fast to that which is good.
Page 47 - ... good work's sake, of indisposition to coin name and fame into money, of unwillingness to use one thing that is well done as a means of passing off upon the public three or four things that are ill done. I know the scientific men of America well, and I entertain a profound conviction that in sincerity, simplicity, fidelity, and generosity of character, in nobility of aims and earnestness of effort, in everything which should be involved in the conception of disinterestedness, they are surpassed,...
Page 301 - ... in connection with the academic pursuit of history and economics. The scope of this paper does not include a discussion of the subjects and the order of studies designed to give the investigator the power to discover statistically the laws which govern the action of social and economic forces. Such a course would necessarily be long and severe.
Page 156 - Manual training is essential to the right and full development of the human mind, and therefore no less beneficial to those who are not going to become artisans than to those who are. The workshop method of instruction is of great educational value, for it brings the learner face to face with the facts of nature ; his mind increases in knowledge by direct personal experience with forms of matter and manifestations of force. No mere words intervene. The manual exercises of the shop train mental power,...
Page 275 - ... or less powerful through the remaining years of his life. Of the severer forms of athletic competition and contest, which injuriously affect the constitution and permanently impair the vital force, but one thing can be said : they are evil and only evil. No earthly object, except the saving of others' lives or the defence of one's country, could justify such destructive exercises and exertions.
Page 171 - I consider that the results go far to prove that manual training is so great a relief to the iteration of school work that it is a positive benefit rather than a detriment to the course in the •other studies.

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