Discussions on Climate and Cosmology

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 21, 2013 - Science - 346 pages
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The cause of the ice ages was a puzzle to nineteenth-century climatologists. One of the most popular theories was that the affected continents must somehow have been hugely elevated and, like mountains, iced over. However, in this 1885 study of the problem, James Croll (1821-90) argues that such staggering movement would have been impossible. Instead, he puts forward a new theory: that the eccentricity of the earth's orbit changes at regular intervals over long periods, creating 'great secular summers and winters'. Adopting a meticulous approach to the facts, he disproves a host of well-established notions across several disciplines and makes some remarkable deductions, including the effect of ocean currents on climate, the temperature of space, and even the age of the sun. With a focus on logical argument and explanation rather than mathematics, his book remains fascinating and accessible to students in the history of science.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
1
CHAPTER II
17
Tables of Eccentricity Influence of Winter in Aphe1ion Influ
38
CHAPTER V
64
CHAPTER VI
82
CHAPTER VIII
126
CHAPTER IX
143
CHAPTER XI
176
CHAPTER XII
197
CHAPTER XV
248
CHAPTER XVI
258
CHAPTER XVII
264
CHAPTER XIX
297
INDEX
316
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