Diseases of Occupation from the Legislative, Social, and Medical Points of View

Front Cover
Methuen & Company, 1916 - Factory laws and legislation - 476 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 148 - ... from the Annual Report of the Chief Inspector of Factories for the year 1906.
Page xvi - ... any person who has entered into or works under a contract of service or apprenticeship with an employer, whether by way of manual labour, clerical work, or otherwise, and whether >the contract is expressed or implied, is oral or in writing...
Page 161 - ... assistants, ware cleaners, and glost placers should be subjected to systematic medical inspection.
Page 160 - ... 2. There are, however, certain branches of the pottery industry in which it would be more difficult to dispense with the use of lead compounds. But there is no reason why, in these cases, the lead so employed should not be in the form of a fritted double silicate. Such a compound, if properly made, is but slightly attacked by even strong hydrochloric, acetic, or lactic acid. There...
Page 232 - In the 10 years 1885-1895, 72.5 per cent of the death's among knife grinders in the Solingen district was due to phthisis, against 35.3 per cent for the rest of the population over 14 years of age, and an official examination showed that out of 1,250 grinders only 85 men were over 45 years of age. Dr. Shadwell speaks approvingly of the methods adopted in some of the Solingen factories to deal with the removal of dust. Oldendorf, in writing about...
Page xiii - An Act for the Preservation of the Health and Morals of Apprentices and others employed in Cotton and other Mills and Cotton and other Factories...
Page 273 - Nystagmus. — This disease is prevalent among miners in certain districts, especially where the coal seams are thin. It is due primarily to fatigue of the elevator muscles of the eyes from the constrained position, in an oblique upward direction, in which the eyes have to be kept. Insufficiency of light from the lamp would appear to be a secondary but not inconsiderable cause. The miner mainly affected is the hewer who works at the coal face, but deputies in low seams, the...
Page 7 - ... doses of the poison into other animals and produced in them symptoms of fatigue, drowsiness, and a lessening of activity. Large doses caused death, but if very minute doses were injected for a lengthened period there was established in the animals a genuine immunity to fatigue. The toxin is not found in the blood but in the muscles, whereas the antitoxin is only present in the blood.
Page 233 - The walls of the workrooms are limewashed every year; the floors are swept every evening and damp-wiped once a week. The " rasing " of grindstones is never undertaken during working hours except under a stream of water or unless the stone is entirely inclosed in casing except at the working place of the rasing tool. The floors are kept clean and provision is made for the removal of the dust during grinding. Cutlery manufacture is recognized as a dangerous trade...
Page 6 - The waste products added to the blood act upon the nerve endings in muscle and upon the grey matter of the brain, and create a sense of fatigue. Although the sensation of tiredness is referred by us to the overworked muscles, the location of the cause is less in the peripheral than in the central nervous system. On the one hand waste products act upon the muscles, diminish their contractility...

Bibliographic information