Distance Learning Technologies: Issues, Trends and Opportunities: Issues, Trends and Opportunities

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Lau, Linda K.
Idea Group Inc (IGI), Jul 1, 1999 - Education - 252 pages
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In today's technology-crazed environment, distance learning is touted as a cost-effective option for delivering employee training and higher education programs, such as bachelor's, master's and even doctoral degrees.

Distance Learning Technologies: Issues, Trends and Opportunities provides readers with an in-depth understanding of distance learning and the technologies available for this innovative media of learning and instruction. It traces the development of distance learning from its history to suggestions of a solid strategic implementation plan to ensure its successful and effective deployment.

 

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Contents

WebBased Learning and Instruction A Constructivist Approach
1
Interactive Distance Learning
16
Summative and Formative Evaluaitons of InternetBased Teaching
22
Implementing Corporate Distance Training Using Change Management Strategic Planning and Project Management
39
Three Strategies for the Use of Distance Learning Technology in Higher Education
52
Distance Learning Alliances in Higher Education
69
Elements of a Successful Distributed Learning Program
82
Online Teaching and Learning Essential Condtions for Success
91
The Emergence of Distance Learning in Higher Education A Revised Group Decision Support System Typology with Empirical Results
143
Commuting the Distance of Distance Learning The Pepperdine Story
157
The Web as a Learning Environment for Kids Case Study Little Horus
166
WebBased Instruction Systems
186
A Case for Case Studies via VideoConferencing
208
WebBased Training for the Network Marketing Industry
218
About the Authors
246
Index
251

Developing a Learning Environment Applying Technology and TQM to Distance Learning
107
Digital Video in Education
124

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Page 7 - On the active hand, experience is trying — a meaning which is made explicit in the connected term experiment. On the passive, it is undergoing. When we experience something we act upon it, we do something with it ; then we suffer or undergo the consequences. We do something to the thing and then it does something to us in return : such is the peculiar combination. The connection of these two phases of experience measures the fruitfulness or value of the experience.
Page 7 - Mere activity does not constitute experience. It is dispersive, centrifugal, dissipating. Experience as trying involves change, but change is meaningless transition unless it is consciously connected with the return wave of consequences which flow from it. When an activity is continued into the undergoing of consequences, when the change made by action is reflected back into a change made in us, the mere flux is loaded with significance.
Page 7 - ... do something to the thing and then it does something to us in return: such is the peculiar combination. The connection of these two phases of experience measures the fruitfulness or value of the experience. Mere activity does not constitute experience. It is dispersive, centrifugal, dissipating. Experience as trying involves change, but change is meaningless transition unless it is consciously connected with the return wave of consequences which flow from it.

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About the author (1999)

Linda K. Lau, Ph.D. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) is a financial consultant associate with Salomon Smith Barney, Inc. in Richmond, VA. For the past five years, she was an Assistant Professor and Discipline Coordinator for MIS in the School of Business and Economics at Longwood College, Farmville, VA. She was the author and co-author of numerous articles and an ad-hoc reviewer of the Information Resource Management Journal and SAM Advanced Management Journal. She was listed in Who's Who Among American Teachers, 5th Edition (1998), and in International Who's Who of Professionals for the Year 1997. Her past research interests include using the Behavioral Anchored Rating Scales (BARS) for employee performance evaluations, developing Web pages, writing applets using Java programming language, and distance learning. [Editor]

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