Distant Sovereignty: National Imperialism and the Origins of British India

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Psychology Press, 2002 - History - 216 pages
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In this broad study of British rule in India during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, Sudipta Sen takes up this dual agenda, sketching out the interrelationships between nationalism, imperialism, and identity formation as they played out in both England and South Asia.
 

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Contents

The State and Its Colonial Frontiers
1
History as Imperial Lesson
27
Invasive Prospects
57
Domesticity and Dominion
85
ChapterS The Decline of Intimacy
119
Afterword
151
Select Bibliography
185
Index
201
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About the author (2002)

Sudipta Sen is assistant professor of history at Syracuse University. His first book, Empire of Free Trade: The East India Company and the Making of Colonial Marketplace was nominated for the John Ben Snow prize of the Council of British Studies and the Morris Forkosch prize of the American Historical Association.

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