Distributed Feedback Semiconductor Lasers

Front Cover
IET, 1998 - Technology & Engineering - 412 pages
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The need for greater bandwidth has driven laser manufacturers towards the use of distributed feedback semiconductor (DFB) lasers with a well-defined single mode. These semiconductor diode-based devices are now essential components in a broad range of advanced optical systems. This text covers the materials, operation and design strategies of DFB lasers. It provides detailed accounts of large-signal time-domain numerical modelling techniques, which can be extended to optical systems and components other than DFB lasers. Numerical MATLAB programs are outlined in the text.
 

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Contents

The semiconductordiode laser
1
Gain loss and spontaneous emission
37
Principles of modelling guided waves
76
Optical energy exchange in guides
97
Basic principles of lasers with distributed feedback
128
More advanced distributed feedback laser design
165
Numerical modelling for DFB lasers
209
directions
228
References
364
References
371
Ideal amplification
374
The attenuator
377
mode counting
378
Aperture theory
379
Numerical modelling of spontaneous noise
380
Higherorder noise statistics
384

Future devices modelling and systems analysis
252
Maxwell plane waves and reflections
304
four special cases
310
TM slab modes
317
References
323
Smallsignal analysis of singlemode laser
329
Smallsignal FM response of singlemode laser
336
Electromagneticenergy exchange and rate equations reconciled
344
References
351
KramersKronig relationships
357
References
385
Laser packaging
386
Thermal considerations
388
Packagerelated backreflections and fibre coupling
389
References
391
Tables of device parameters and simulated performance for DFB laser structures
392
About MATLAB programs
396
Introduction to the programs
398
Index
405
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About the author (1998)

John Carroll is a Professor in the Department of Engineering and Head of the Electrical Division at Cambridge University. He joined the university as a Lecturer and Fellow of Queen's College in 1967, forming a research group studying Gunn and Trapatt microwave devices. He has authored three books on semiconductor devices but for the last ten years the emphasis of his work and publications has been the design and modelling of laser diodes. He is currently Chairman of the Council of the School of Technology and a member of the university's General Board.

James Whiteaway graduated from Queen's College, Cambridge, in 1973 and joined Standard Telecommunications Laboratories (now Nortel) at Harlow, UK, to work on laser diodes. He gained his PhD from Cambridge University in 1983 for his published work on semiconductor lasers. He is now the External Research Co-ordinator for the Nortel Optical Communications Programme Unit and leads a team researching optical device modelling. He has accomplished pioneering work on phase-shifted DFBs which have set the industry standards for performance of distributed feedback laser devices.

Dick Plumb graduated from Christ's College, Cambridge, in 1973 after holding a commission in the Royal Navy. Having gained his PhD on high-speed photodiodes, he joined the Standard Telecommunication Laboratories in 1977. Later he worked for BT and D Technologies Ltd. on laser diode technology materials, and took a leading role in a number of European programmes introducing DFB lasers into optical communication systems. He currently leads research into high-power and tunable laser diodes at the Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, which he joined as a lecturer and Fellow of Peterhouse in 1991.