Distribution and Migration of North American Gulls and Their Allies

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U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1915 - Gulls - 70 pages
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Page 21 - ... Late dates of departure : Lower California, San Geronimo Island, March 17; California, Point Pinos, April 25 ; Washington, Port Townsend, May 19; British Columbia, May 24. Fall migration. — Mainly eastward and southward off the coasts, beginning in July and reaching British Columbia in September. Average date of arrival at Point Pinos is November 14, earliest November 5. Late dates of departure: Alaska, Point Barrow, August 31, and St. Michael about October 15; Pribilof Islands, St. Paul, October...
Page 12 - Numerous records from the interior of the United States and Canada would seem to indicate that the main migration route is overland rather than coastwise. Winter. — Prof. Wells W. Cooke (1915) makes the remarkable statement that " it seems probable that the long-tailed jaeger does not regularly winter anywhere in the Western Hemisphere. The winter home is in the Eastern Hemisphere, south to Gibraltar on the Atlantic side and to Japan on the Pacific.
Page 66 - ... 8th or 10th of this month, and these birds are usually the young of the year. Winter. — On the southward migration the Sabine's gull has occurred on both coasts of North America, probably migrants from different breeding stations, and at many points in the interior. Prof. WW Cooke (1915) says that "the only place where Sabine's gull has been found in winter is on the coast of Peru. Here it is common in Callao Bay from December to April.
Page 2 - Dakotas follow the plowman to pick up the insect larvae uncovered by the share. That at least one community has not been unmindful of the substantial debt it owes the gull is attested in Salt Lake City, where stands a monument surmounted by a bronze figure of two gulls, erected by the people of that city "in grateful remembrance" of the signal service rendered by these birds at a critical time in the history of the community.
Page 66 - ... North America, probably migrants from different breeding stations, and at many points in the interior. Prof. WW Cooke (1915) says that "the only place where Sabine's gull has been found in winter is on the coast of Peru. Here it is common in Callao Bay from December to April." He also suggests that " whenever the winter home of Ross's gull is discovered, Sabine's gull will probably be found there also, for the two species arrived together at the mouth of the Kolyma River, Siberia, the 1st of...
Page 3 - A few years ago the public awoke to the barbarity of such slaughter, and after much agitation New Jersey, in 1885, enacted the first effective State law prohibiting the killing of gulls. This example has been followed by other States until now — 1915 — there are 40 States which protect gulls all the year.
Page 2 - It would be well if such sentiment prevailed elsewhere throughout the United States. However, within the last few years much progress has been made in protecting these most beautiful dwellers of coasts and marshes.
Page 4 - ... no market for his spoils. To California belongs the credit of incorporating in the game law of 1895 the first law in this country prohibiting the sale of gulls' plumage for millinery purposes.
Page 2 - Gulls, erected by the people of that city 'in grateful remembrance' of the signal service rendered by these birds at a critical time in the history of the community. For three consecutive years— 1848 to 1850— black crickets by millions threatened to ruin the crops upon which depended the very lives of the settlers. Large flocks of California Gulls came to the rescue and devoured vast numbers of the destructive insects, until the fields were entirely freed from them. It is no wonder that the sentiment...
Page 27 - Coasts of the North Pacific, Bering Sea, and the adjacent Arctic Ocean, south to Lower California and Japan.

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