Divine Madness: On Interpreting Literature, Music, and the Visual Arts Ironically

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Bucknell University Press, 2002 - Art - 307 pages
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This book provides a theory that enables the concept of irony to be transferred from the literary to the visual and aural domains. Topics include the historical roots of the concept of irony as modes of oral and literary expression, and how irony relates to spatiality.
 

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Contents

History
15
THE BEGINNING OF A NEW STORY
25
Irony and the Problem of Intentionalism
29
IRONY AND WRITING
34
IRONY AND INTERPRETATION
40
THE IRONY OF INTENTIONS
44
Classifications of Irony
50
INDISTINCTIONS
53
Irony and Mysticism
118
KABBALAH MEISTER ECKHART AND CELAN
126
Irony and the Arts
135
Titles
137
The Lied
138
Visualized Dramatic Irony
140
Drama and Theater
141
Music Drama and Opera
143

The Creation of Irony
58
UNSTABLE STABILITIES IN DICKENSS OLIVER TWIST
67
STABLE INSTABILITIES IN ERASMUS OF ROTTERDAMS PRAISE OF FOLLY
76
Irony Obliqueness and Incongruities
84
Lying
85
Sarcasm
89
Humor
90
Dialectics
93
Metaphor
94
Allegory
95
Litotes and Hyperbole
96
Satire
98
Ambiguity
100
Heteroglossia
103
Opposition
104
Antithesis
105
Contrariety
106
Paradox
107
Incongruity
110
SIMILES AND INCONGRUITIES IN KAFKA
114
Dance
146
Other Areas
151
INTERTEXTUAL IRONY AND PARODY
152
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN?
158
The Irony of the Arts
165
EMPTY SIGNS FULL OF IRONY?
168
CAGE
170
The Spatial Metaphors of Irony
175
IRONY AND SPATIALITY
184
SPACY MAGRITTE
193
Musical Meaning Irony and Value
201
MUSICAL CONTRASTS AND HUMOR
210
ROMANTIC IRONY AND SPATIALITY
215
SHOSTAKOVICH AND THE QUEST FOR INTENTIONS
224
GOOD MUSIC BAD MUSIC OR IRONIC MUSIC?
234
Nachspiel
241
Notes
246
Bibliography
274
Index
290
Copyright

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Page 30 - You know, Phaedrus, that's the strange thing about writing which makes it truly analogous to painting. The painter's products stand before us as though they were alive, but, if you question them, they maintain a most majestic silence.
Page 13 - When all things began, the Word already was. The Word dwelt with God, and what God was, the Word was. The Word, then, was with God at the beginning, and through him all things came to be; no single thing was created without him.

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