Divine Teaching and the Way of the World: A Defense of Revealed Religion

Front Cover
OUP Oxford, Apr 21, 2011 - Philosophy - 559 pages
0 Reviews
Samuel Fleischacker defends what the Enlightenment called 'revealed religion': religions that regard a certain text or oral teaching as sacred, as wholly authoritative over one's life. At the same time, he maintains that revealed religions stand in danger of corruption or fanaticism unless they are combined with secular scientific practices and a secular morality. The first two parts of Divine Teaching and the Way of the World argue that the cognitive and moral practices of a society should prescind from religious commitments — they constitute a secular 'way of the world', to adapt a phrase from the Jewish tradition, allowing human beings to work together regardless of their religious differences. But the way of the world breaks down when it comes to the question of what we live for, and it is this that revealed religions can illumine. Fleischacker first suggests that secular conceptions of why life is worth living are often poorly grounded, before going on to explore what revelation is, how it can answer the question of worth better than secular worldviews do, and how the revealed and way-of-the-world elements of a religious tradition can be brought together.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Truth
21
Ethics
77
Worth
165
Part IV Divine Teaching
279
Part V Divine Teaching and the Way of the World
411
Epilogue
465
Proofs of God
473
Maimonides on the Evidence for Revelation
476
Kant on Art and Natural Beauty
478
Notes
481
Index Locorum
543
Index
545
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)


Samuel Fleischacker is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Illinois-Chicago. His previous work has focused on Enlightenment moral and political thought, especially that of Kant and Adam Smith, and on conceptions of culture, liberalism and distributive justice. He is the author of A Third Concept of Liberty (Princeton, 1999) and A Short History of Distributive Justice (Harvard, 2004) and editor of Heidegger's Jewish Followers (Duquesne, 2008). In 2009 his book, On Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations, was given the 2009 Joseph B. Gittler Award by the American Philosophical Association, for an outstanding book in the philosophy of social science. Since 2010, he has been Director of Jewish Studies at the University of Illinois-Chicago.

Bibliographic information