Doctors: The Biography of Medicine

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Oct 19, 2011 - Biography & Autobiography - 544 pages
From the author of How We Die, the extraordinary story of the development of modern medicine, told through the lives of the physician-scientists who paved the way.

How does medical science advance? Popular historians would have us believe that a few heroic individuals, possessing superhuman talents, lead an unselfish quest to better the human condition. But as renowned Yale surgeon and medical historian Sherwin B. Nuland shows in this brilliant collection of linked life portraits, the theory bears little resemblance to the truth. Through the centuries, the men and women who have shaped the world of medicine have been not only very human, but also very much the products of their own times and places. Presenting compelling studies of great medical innovators and pioneers, Doctors gives us a fascinating history of modern medicine. Ranging from the legendary Father of Medicine, Hippocrates, to Andreas Vesalius, whose Renaissance masterwork on anatomy offered invaluable new insight into the human body, to Helen Taussig, founder of pediatric cardiology and co-inventor of the original "blue baby" operation, here is a volume filled with the spirit of ideas and the thrill of discovery.
 

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Doctors: the biography of medicine

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An historical outline develops as Nuland (Yale School of Medicine) examines the biographies of significant doctors engaged in the art and science of medicine. He considers philosophical and ethical ... Read full review

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This book misstates the facts on Charles Jackson and it is a disservice to his contribution to the discovery of anesthesia for surgery. A Google or a Pubmed search will reveal sources with correct information about Dr. Jackson, who suffered a stroke in the language area of his brain and was subsequently admitted to McLean Asylum. He never regained the ability to speak, but he was not psychotic or insane.
See the following Pubmed article on this topic, which contains notes from Dr. Jackson's autopsy revealing that he indeed suffered a stroke in the language area.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17641787
See the following book with relevant information and notes from Dr. Jackson's family regarding his condition after he suffered the stroke, which shows that he was not insane:
http://www.historyofscience.com/norman-publishing/science-technology/jackson.php
 

Contents

Hippocrates
3
THE PARADOX 0F PERGAMON
31
THE REAWAKENING
61
THE GENTLE SURGEON
94
NATURE HERSELF MUST BE oun ADVISOR
120
WHY THE LEAvEs CHANGED CoLoR IN THE AUTUMN
171
WITHOUT DIAcNosIs THERE Is NO RATIoNAL TREATMENT
200
THE CERM THEORY BEFORE cERMs
238
THE FUNDAMENTAL UNIT OF LIFE
304
OF THE IMMoRTAI SPIRIT
343
MEDICAL SCIENCE CoMEs To AMERICA
386
I4 A TRIUMPH OF TwENTIETHCENTURY MEDICINE
422
NEW HEARTs FOR
457
BIBLIOGRAPHY491
491
INDEX5n
511
Copyright

I0 SURGERY wITHoUr PAIN
263

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About the author (2011)

Sherwin B. Nuland, M.D., was a clinical professor of surgery at Yale University and the author of numerous books, including How We Die: Reflections on Life's Final Chapter, which won the National Book Award, Lost in America: A Journey with My Father, Maimonides, and Leonardo da Vinci. In addition to his numerous articles for medical publications, he wrote for The New Yorker, The New York Times, The New Republic, Time, and The New York Review of Books. Dr. Nuland died in 2014.

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