Doctrine and Doctrinal Disruption: Being an Examination of the Intellectual Position of the Church of England

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Page 183 - ... organization," and others, which tacitly liken a society to a living creature : they are assumed to be phrases having a certain convenience but expressing no fact — tending rather to foster a fiction. And yet metaphors are here more than metaphors in the ordinary sense. They are devices of speech hit upon to suggest a truth at first dimly perceived, but which grows clearer the more carefully the evidence is examined. That there is a real analogy between an individual organism and a social organism,...
Page 183 - body politic," "political organization," and others, which tacitly liken a society to a living creature : they are assumed to be phrases having a certain convenience but expressing no fact — tending rather to foster a fiction. And yet metaphors are here more than metaphors in the ordinary sense. They are devices of speech hit upon to suggest a truth at first dimly perceived, but which grows clearer the more carefully the evidence is examined. That there is a real analogy between an individual...
Page 256 - This book aims at being a handbook for all public speakers or other disputants who desire to meet and expose the fallacies of socialism. It approaches these from the labourer's point of view, and deals with them one by one, refuting them by the means, not only of argument, but also of statistics and industrial history. It points out further on what the hopes of labour depend ; and shows how great and inspiriting these hopes reasonably may be, if, instead of attacking the existing industrial system,...
Page 189 - ... that which initiates and guides organization of every kind. So long as, in a mass of living matter, all parts are alike, and all parts similarly live and grow without aid from one another, there is no organization : the undifferentiated aggregate of protoplasm thus characterized, belongs to the lowest grade of living things. Without distinct faculties, and capable of but the feeblest movements, it cannot adjust itself to circumstances ; and is at the mercy of environing destructive actions. The...
Page 179 - ... cardinal notions of continuity, and complexity, and contingency, of causation, it introduces him to a further conception of moment, which the inorganic Concrete Sciences do not furnish — the conception of what we may call fructifying causation. For as it is a distinction between living and not-living bodies that the first propagate while the second do not ; it is also a distinction between them that certain actions which go on in the first are cumulative, instead of being, as in the second,...
Page 256 - Classes and Masses, or Wealth, Wages, and Welfare In the United Kingdom. A Handbook of Social Facts tor Political Thinkers and Speakers. 16mo. $1.25. MALLOCK.— Labor and the Popular Welfare. New edition. I2H10. 90 cis. MAYO-SMITH
Page 189 - ... adjust itself to circumstances, and is at the mercy of environing destructive actions. The changes by which this structureless mass becomes a structured mass, having the characters and powers possessed by what we call an organism, are changes through which its parts lose their original likenesses, and do this while assuming the unlike kinds of activity for which their respective positions toward one another and surrounding things fit them.
Page 256 - Students who are used to associate economics with a laborious style, will be agreeably surprised at the lucidity and simplicity of Mr. Mallock's exposition, the brilliance of his manner, and the aptitude of his illustrations." — The Times. " The book is one of the most valuable contributions that have been offered to the discussion of what has now become the problem of social problems Regarded as a popularly written exposure of current economic errors and...
Page 101 - ... their day. It seeks for points of connection with the Old Testament and its developments, with the religious life of the synagogue, with contemporary hopes for the future, with the whole intellectual and spiritual condition of the world of Greece and Rome: and it finds that the evidence of such connection is unmistakable.
Page 255 - Maliock has one great merit as compared with most of the writers who have dealt in this country or elsewhere with the principles of sociology. He does not envelop the subject in a cloud of philosophic phraseology, he is always lucid and orderly, and he relieves his argument by welcome touches of satire and humour. His last book shows no deficiency in these qualities, and it is also perhaps the most complete and sustained effort of reasoning which he has so far produced."— Literature. "It is difficult...

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