Doing Justice to Court Interpreting

Front Cover
Miriam Shlesinger, Franz Pöchhacker
John Benjamins Publishing, 2010 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 246 pages
First published as a Special Issue of "Interpreting" (10:1, 2008) and complemented with two articles published in "Interpreting" (12:1, 2010), this volume provides a panoramic view of the complex and uniquely constrained practice of court interpreting. In an array of empirical papers, the nine authors explore the potential of court interpreters to make or break the proceedings, from the perspectives of the minority language speaker and of the other participants. The volume offers thoughtful overviews of the tensions and conflicts typically associated with the practice of court interpreting. It looks at the attitudes of judicial authorities towards interpreting, and of interpreters towards the concept of a code of ethics. With further themes such as the interplay of different groups of "linguists" at the Tokyo War Crimes Tribunal and the language rights of indigenous communities, it opens novel perspectives on the study of interpreting at the interface between the letter of the law and its implementation.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Interpreting at the Tokyo War Crimes Tribunal
9
Judicial systems in contact
29
Missing stitches
55
Norms ethics and roles among military court interpreters
85
Interpreting reported speech in witnesses evidence
101
The cooperative courtroom
125
Judges deviations from normbased direct speech in court
163
Interactional pragmatics and court interpreting
193
Book Reviews
223
Index
241
The series Benjamins Current Topics BCT
247
Copyright

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