Doing Qualitative Research Differently: A Psychosocial Approach

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SAGE, Nov 12, 2012 - Psychology - 200 pages
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Hollway and Jefferson have updated their ground-breaking book for students and researchers looking to do qualitative research differently. The new edition critically reviews many of the assumptions, claims and methods of qualitative research and also acts as a `how to' guide to the method the authors call the Free Association Narrative Interview.

In the new edition, the authors situate their arguments firmly within a tradition of psychosocial research and show how their method has developed over the last decade. The book follows this approach through the phases of empirical research practice. At each stage they use examples from their own research and end with an extended case study which demonstrates the value of their method in producing a psychosocial research subject; that is, one with socially-imbued depth, complexity and biographical uniqueness.

 

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Contents

the need to do research differently
1
2 Researching the fear of crime
6
3 Producing data with defended subjects
24
4 Analysing data produced with defended subjects
51
5 The ethics of researching psychosocial subjects
77
6 Biography demography and generalisability
96
7 A psychosocial case study
120
Appendix
167
References
168
Index
177
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About the author (2012)

Wendy Hollway is Emeritus Professor in Psychology at the Open University. She is a social and qualitative psychologist with a particular interest in psychoanalytic epistemology and its application to empirical research methodology. With Tony Jefferson, she co-authored Doing Qualitative Research Differently: Free Association, Narrative and the Interview Method, which explored the implications of positin a defended subject for interview research (2nd edition, 2013). In subsequent research, she has developed psychoanalytically informed methods in an empirical project on identity changes involved in becoming mothers, using principles of psychoanalytic (infant) observation in parallel with the Free Association Narrative Interview method. Her recent and current writing documents the implications of British post-Kleinian psychoanalysis for data generation, data analysis, writing and research ethics, based on longitudinal data from interviews, reflective fieldnotes, observation notes and observation seminars with 20 "becoming mothers" in Tower Hamlets. She is a co-founder of the British Psychosocial Studies Network and the European Psycho-societal Research Group. In 2011, she was a visiting Fellow at the Oslo Centre for Advanced Study, in a program entitled "Personal Development and Socio-cultural Change," directed by Profs Harriet Bjerrum Nielsen and Hanne Haavind, from which collaborations continue.

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