Domestic Homoeopathy; Or, Rules for the Domestic Treatment of the Maladies of Infants, Children, and Adults: And for the Conduct and the Treatment During Pregnancy, Confinement, and Suckling

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O. Clapp, 1848 - Homeopathy - 287 pages
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Page 187 - the custom of wearing tightly-laced corsets during gestation, cannot be too severely censured. It must be evident to the plainest understanding, that serious injury to the health of both mother and child, must often result from a continual and forcible compression of the abdomen, whilst nature is at work in gradually enlarging it for the accommodation and the development of the foetus.
Page 281 - Arc there frequent rolling and rumbling in the bowels ? Does the wind readily escape, or is it retained ; and what are the complaints which it seems to give rise to ? Are the evacuations from the bowels effected with ease or difficulty ? How frequent are they ? what is their consistence? are they faecal, or slimy, or bloody, &c.
Page 280 - Are the nostrils obstructed ? Is there a cold in the head, with or without a discharge from the nose ? Sneezing ? Sense of smell. Soreness and rawness of the nostrils, or a bad smell from them ? Bleeding at the nose ? " Are the teeth incrusted with tartar, loose, decayed ; and have any fallen out or been extracted ? Are the gums pale or red, hard or soft, spongy, swollen, apt to bleed, or retracted from the neck of the teeth ? "Is there a dryness of the mouth?
Page 240 - Similia similibus curantur; which simply means that diseases are cured most quickly, safely, and effectually, by medicines which are capable of producing symptoms SIMILAR to those existing in the patient...
Page 282 - Are any 246 large or small worms discharged? Are there abrasions or sore places, warts, or piles in the rectum or anus ; and do the latter sometimes protrude or bleed ? What complaints arise before, or during, or after the urinary discharge ? and is the discharge sparing, or copious ? What is the aspect of the urine ? Is it clear...
Page 284 - Does the patient sleep long, or is he restless, and is the sleep interrupted by frequent waking or startings? Does he talk or moan in his sleep, or has he the night-mare? Is the sleep disturbed by anxious dreams, and of what character? In what posture does the patient lie during sleep? Is he accustomed to sleep with his mouth open? How is his strength? Is he obliged to lie down, or can he remain up? Does he feel languid, weary, or sluggish, etc.?
Page 281 - Is there vomiting of water, saliva or mucus, of an acrimonious, acrid or bitter taste, or of a putrid taste and smell, or of a yellow, green or bloody aspect ? Does the patient vomit coagulated blood, or food ? Is there sickness or nausea ? Is the abdomen TENSE, FULL, HARD, or EMPTY and RETRACTED ? In the case of pains or other complaints in the abdomen, the PARTICULAR REGION in which they are seated should be accurately defined, (for example : pit of the stomach, region of the navel, immediately...
Page 281 - How are the appetite and thirst? What articles of food or drink are preferred? What complaints arise after eating and drinking? Is the patient troubled with frequent belching of wind, with or without taste,— or does it taste of the food just eaten, or of what? Is there regurgitation of fluids from the stomach, or a confluence of saliva in the mouth?
Page 283 - Are there swellings of the bones or joints? are there tubercles or swellings, or swollen or knotted veins ? Are there any parts red, swollen and painful ? Are the hands or feet swollen ? Is there lameness of one or more of the limbs? Are there cramps or spasms, tremor, twitching or starting, stupor or falling asleep, or other morbid sensations in any of the limbs? Is the skin pallid, yellow, &c. ? Is it dry, or inclined to sweat, or otherwise in an unhealthy condition ? Is there itching of the skin...
Page 187 - The custom of wearing tightly laced corsets during gestation cannot be too severely censured. It must be evident to the plainest understanding, that serious injury to the health of both mother and child must often result from a continual and forcible compression of the abdomen, whilst nature is at work in gradually enlarging it for the accommodation and development of the foetus. By this unnatural practice, the circulation of the blood throughout the abdomen is impeded, a circumstance which, together...

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