Domesticated Animals: Their Relation to Man and to His Advancement in Civilization

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1895 - Domestic animals - 267 pages
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Page 8 - From this point of view our domesticated creatures should be presented to our people, with the purpose in mind of bringing them to see that the process of domestication has a farreaching aspect, a dignity, we may fairly say a grandeur, that few human actions possess. If we can impress this view, it will be certain to awaken men to a larger...
Page 51 - A cat is the only animal that has been tolerated, esteemed and at times worshipped without having a single distinctly valuable quality." A few years ago a quail had a nest under a rock opposite my house. Quail raise their young like poultry rather than like robins or wrens or the other song birds. As soon as the tiny quail chicks are hatched, the mother takes them around like a hen with a brood of chickens. This mother quail was my...
Page 186 - ... intelligence, for it has deprived us of precious opportunities in the way of observations on the mental peculiarities which exist in a most interesting group of birds. In these days, when there is much humor for reviving the customs of our forefathers, it might be well for some persons of leisure to give their attention to restoring the arts of falconry. Enough of the practice and of the traditions is left to make it an easy task to reinstitute all the important parts of the custom. Moreover,...
Page 36 - ... our own beneath a host of civilizing influences. It is rare indeed in our day that a dog, unless insane, will bite a human being. The most of their assaults are pure bluster, mere pretence of fury, as is shown by the fact that if, earned away by their pretence, they are led to use their teeth, it is a mere sham assault, having no semblance of the effectiveness of true combat. Something of the pristine fury of the primitive dogs may still be noted in a certain brutal variety of watch -dogs which...
Page 25 - ... dogs have been taught, in somewhat diverse ways, to indicate the presence of birds to the gunner. Although the modes of action of these two breeds are closely related, they are sufficiently distinct to meet certain differences of circumstances. The peculiarities of their actions, it should be noted, are altogether related to the qualities of our fowling-pieces. These have been in use, at least in the form where shot took the place of the single ball, for less than two centuries, and the peculiar...
Page 17 - ... to human beings. Savages appear to make but little use of their dogs in hunting. In fact, those peculiar combinations of instinct and training which we find in our hounds, pointers, setters, and other dogs which have been bred to serve the purposes of sportsmen, have been acquired but slowly, and are of no value except where the search for game is carried on under what we may term civilized conditions. The dog of the savage is in all countries much like his master — a creature with few arts...
Page 130 - ... ancient chase must have been great the triumphs were equally so, and to a people who lived by hunting, most profitable ; a single animal would furnish more food than scores of the lesser beasts such as the reindeer. It is not certain that the extermination of the great northern elephant or mammoth came about through the action of man. It is possible that the death was due to more natural causes, such as the change of climate which attended the decline of the Glacial period, or to the attacks...
Page 269 - ASPECTS OF THE EARTH: a Popular Account of some Familiar Geological Phenomena. With ioo Illustrations.
Page 156 - So nice and well understood are the differences between the sounds which these birds give forth, and so well are their notes appreciated by their companions, that the creatures may well be said to have a language. Though it probably conveys only emotions and not distinct thoughts, it still must' be regarded as a certam kind of speech.
Page 36 - This ready learning from experience is almost the gist of our human quality—at least on the intellectual side of it. Perhaps the greatest success to which man has attained in his education of the dog is to be found in the measure in which he has overcome the fierce rage which clearly characterized the ancestors of this creature when they first felt the mastering hand. The reader cannot understand the intensity of the rage motive in the carnivora unless he has studied some of these brutes in their...

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