Don't Tell Me What to Do, Just Send Money: The Essential Parenting Guide to the College Years

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St. Martin's Press, Jul 5, 2011 - Family & Relationships - 384 pages
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This completely revised and updated edition of Don't Tell Me What To Do, Just Send Money prepares parents for the issues that they will encounter during their children's college years. Since our original publication over ten years ago, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of cell phone and internet technology. The birth of the term ‘helicopter parent' is, in part, due to the instant and frequent connectivity that parents have with their children today. Parents are struggling with the appropriate use of communicative technology and aren't aware of its impact on their child's development, both personally and academically.

With straightforward practicality and using humorous and helpful case examples and dialogues, Don't Tell Me What To Do, Just Send Money helps parents lay the groundwork for a new kind of relationship so that they can help their child more effectively handle everything they'll encounter during their college years.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 From Supervisor to Consultant
3
2 The Electronic Umbilical Cord
33
3 Getting Them Off to College
56
4 Roommates Fraternity Parties Allnighters Changing Majors and Hanging Out
74
5 Is Your Child Confident Confused or Coasting?
118
6 Just When You Get Used to the Empty Nest Theyre Back
163
7 Understanding the College Experience
188
9 So You Always Wanted to Be a Doctor
240
10 When to Worry When to Act
261
11 If They Leave College Will They Ever Get Back on Track?
295
12 Understanding Your Childs Postgraduate Choices
312
Endnotes
351
References
355
Index
357
Copyright

8 2000 a Week for a College Education
220

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About the author (2011)

HELEN JOHNSON founded and directed Cornell University's first Parents' Program and is now engaged in her own consulting business with college parents and universities.

CHRISTINE SCHELAS-MILLER teaches a course on adolescence and emerging adulthood in the department of human development at Cornell University and coordinates student advising as the assistant director of undergraduate studies. She was previously an associate dean of students at Cornell.

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