Don't Eat Your Heart Out Cookbook

Front Cover
Workman Pub., 1994 - Cooking - 664 pages
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With over 939,000 copies in print, used and recommended by more than 5,500 hospitals, and now completely revised and updated, Don't Eat Your Heart Out Cookbook is the bible for anyone seeking a heart-healthy diet.

Incorporating the latest scientific and nutritional studies, lay expert Joe Piscatella outlines an effective plan for life-long heart health and explains the science behind it in plain-speaking language we all can understand.

Packed with 400 healthy, low-fat recipes-soups, salads, sandwiches, poultry, seafood, and even red meats and desserts-painstakingly developed by Joe's wife Bernie, this indispensable book is a step-by-step guide to achieving a permanent change in dietary patterns. The author provides countless tips on adapting everyday recipes, ordering judiciously in restaurants, decreasing salt and sugar intake, losing weight and keeping it off. The new edition pays special attention to women and heart disease, explains HDL and LDL cholesterol and what the numbers really mean, and discusses coronary regression, the benefits of aspirin, and lifestyle factors vs. genetics. It dispels food myths--that shrimp is a no-no, alcohol is always unhealthy, and ground turkey is better than ground beef--and shows how to make use of low-fat food products. “/DIV>

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Contents

The Heart and
3
What Is Coronary
12
Cardiac Risk Factors
21
Copyright

32 other sections not shown

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About the author (1994)

Author Joseph C. Piscatella has been a keen observer of American eating habits since 1977, when emergency open-heart surgery at the age of 32 forced him to recognize the intimate connection between dietary habits and overall health. His successful recovery and determination to make adjustment in his own lifestyle and diet inspired a new career as an active proponent of healthy lifestyle changes. As president of the Institute for Fitness and Health, Inc. in Tacoma, Washington, he lectures extensively to a variety of clients, including medical organizations, corporations and professional associations, and is a consultant on major wellness projects for Fortune 500 companies, the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force. Cited in Time for their practicality and effectiveness, his seminars deal with the management of lifestyle habits to increase health, longevity and productivity. Mr. Piscatella is the only non-medical member of the National Institute of Health Cardiac Rehabilitation Expert Panel, which develops clinical practice guidelines for physicians. He is also a member of the Association for Worksite Health Promotion, the American Association of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, and the National Wellness Association.

Author Joseph C. Piscatella has been a keen observer of American eating habits since 1977, when emergency open-heart surgery at the age of 32 forced him to recognize the intimate connection between dietary habits and overall health. His successful recovery and determination to make adjustment in his own lifestyle and diet inspired a new career as an active proponent of healthy lifestyle changes. As president of the Institute for Fitness and Health, Inc. in Tacoma, Washington, he lectures extensively to a variety of clients, including medical organizations, corporations and professional associations, and is a consultant on major wellness projects for Fortune 500 companies, the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force. Cited in Time for their practicality and effectiveness, his seminars deal with the management of lifestyle habits to increase health, longevity and productivity. Mr. Piscatella is the only non-medical member of the National Institute of Health Cardiac Rehabilitation Expert Panel, which develops clinical practice guidelines for physicians. He is also a member of the Association for Worksite Health Promotion, the American Association of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, and the National Wellness Association.

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