Dorothea Dix: Advocate for Mental Health Care

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, USA, Apr 8, 2004 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 127 pages
By exposing the sickening conditions people with mental illness endured in jails, almshouses, and basement cells, Dorothea Dix (1802-1887) single-handedly transformed the U.S. system of mental health care in the 19th century. Dix traveled from state to state, describing the hideous suffering people who were both poor and mentally ill endured at the hands of their captors. Her tireless research and personal lobbying of legislators led to construction of asylums for the mentally ill in state after state.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

the book is good because it teaches you about health and how to take care of your body and it still helps nursers to day!!!

Contents

1 A GIRL BEGINS HER LONELY JOURNEY
7
2 THE WORLD IS MY HOME
15
3 A TEACHER AND AN AUTHOR
25
4 BEGINNING THE GREAT WORK
40
5 I SHALL BE OBLIGED TO SPEAK WITH GREAT PLAINNESS
51
6 MORAL TREATMENT FOR PRISONERS
67
7 A VETO AT HOME A WELCOME IN EUROPE
81
8 A MODEL OF CHARITY FOR THE SOUTH
91
9 THE AMERICAN FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE
98
10 MORE TRAVEL MORE BATTLES
111
AFTERWORD
117
CHRONOLOGY
120
FURTHER READING
122
INDEX
124
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)


Meg Muckenhoupt has written articles on travel in Boston and local environmental issues for The Boston Globe, the Boston Phoenix, Boston Magazine and the Time Out Boston guide. Her book Sigmund Freud: Explorer of the Unconscious (Oxford University Press) won the American Academy of Sciences 1998 Best science Books for Junior High and High school readers, and has been translated into seven languages. She holds a certificate in Field Botany from the New England Wild Flower Society.