Doun I' Th' Loudons: A Drama of Country Life in Five Acts, and Other Pieces (all New)

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W. Macdonald, 1908 - Scottish drama - 298 pages
 

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Page 256 - WHEN Britain first, at Heaven's command, Arose from out the azure main, This was the charter of the land, And guardian angels sung this strain : "Rule, Britannia, rule the waves; Britons never will be slaves.
Page 193 - A person who was suddenly aroused from sleep by a few drops of water sprinkled in his face, dreamed of the events of an entire life in which happiness and sorrow were mingled, and which finally terminated with an altercation upon the borders of an extensive lake, in which his exasperated companion, after a considerable struggle, succeeded in plunging him.
Page 193 - A dream requiring hours for its accomplishment, is begun and terminated in a few seconds. A person who was suddenly aroused from sleep by a few drops of water sprinkled in his face, dreamed of the events of an entire life in which happiness and sorrow were mingled, and which finally terminated with an altercation upon the borders of an extensive lake, in which his exasperated companion, after a considerable struggle, succeeded in plunging him.
Page 184 - Generally, however, dreams are wanting in coherence; all probabilities, and even possibilities of " time, place, and circumstance" are violated. Friends long since dead appear and converse with us; and events long since past rise up before us with all the vividness of real existence. We may be conveyed to the antipodes, or even to worlds beyond our own, without the difficulty of the distance at all standing in the way. We are not aware of the grossest incongruities, probably because we are unable...
Page 138 - ... was advancing, when John Copeland, one of his attendants, hastily passing before him, the portcullis was let down, and Copeland, mistaken for his lord, remained a prisoner. The countess, who from a high tower was observing the event, cried out to Salisbury with her wonted humour, " Farewell, Montague ! I intended that you should have supped with us, and assisted in defending this fortress against the English.
Page 246 - The number of miracles performed at this well was so great that in 1309, John Abernethy, with the assistance of the monks at Melrose, procured a shrine to be erected and dedicated to the Holy Mother. In 1413 there were no less than 15,653 pilgrims of all nations, and the offerings were equal to 1422 merks.
Page 139 - English hurled stones or leaden balls against the battlements, she, as in scorn, ordered one of her maids, splendidly dressed, to wipe off, with a clean white handkerchief, the marks of the stroke. The Castle continued to
Page 245 - Whitekirk), to which she was carried. The English, however, ravaging the country, they were obliged to halt while a party of them passed, during which time, being in great agony, she prayed to the Holy Mother for relief, when a hermit came and told her if she had faith to drink of that holy well she would...
Page 227 - In it are coves, als profitable for defence of men, as (if) thay were biggit be crafty industry. Every thing that is in that crag is ful of admiration and wounder...

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