Down Syndrome: The Facts

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1997 - Family & Relationships - 192 pages
2 Reviews
row will we cope? Why did it happen to us? How will we tell our other children? What help is available to us? Will our child be able to work, to marry, or have children? These are just a few questions frequently asked by parents that are discussed in this positive, practical, and comprehensive guide. Dr. Mark Selikowitz, a consultant paediatrician, has drawn on his extensive experience of children with Down syndrome to write this sympathetic and authoritative book, and to dispel the many false notions about the syndrome. Most children are now brought up at home and this book gives theirparents the information they need to make choices about treatment, education, and general welfare. In this new edition, he looks at the many new developments that have taken place over the past few years in educational, social, and employment opportunities for people with Down syndrome as well as changes in community attitudes. A particularly encouraging development is the greater attentionpaid to the wishes of people with Down syndrome, and this book offers advice and reassurance to these people as well as providing an essential guide to their parents and the many health workers who have contact with Down syndrome children and adults.
 

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Contents

The first days are the hardest
1
Coping with family and friends
13
What is Down syndrome?
24
How Down syndrome comes about
31
Your childs development
41
Your childs health
63
The heart
83
Your childs behaviour
91
Early intervention and preschool groups
118
Which school?
129
Adolescence
138
Adulthood
149
Controversial treatments
169
Future pregnancies
176
Conclusion
186
Useful addresses
187

A guide to services
102
Assessment
109

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About the author (1997)


Mark Selikowitz is a consultant developmental paediatrician in Sydney. He is a former director of the child development unit at the Sydney Children's Hospital, and the author of several books on aspects of child development.

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