Dr Southwood Smith: A Retrospect

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Cambridge University Press, Dec 22, 2011 - History - 204 pages
Thomas Southwood Smith (1788-1861) was a minister, physician and social reformer, who considerably improved the health of the poor by linking sanitation with epidemics. A utilitarian, and friend of Jeremy Bentham, his arguments in The Use of the Dead to the Living (1827) helped lead to the Anatomy Act of 1832 which allowed corpses from workhouses to be sold to medical schools, and so ended the market for grave-robbers while improving medical education. Although the fame of his granddaughter, Octavia Hill, has eclipsed his own reputation, Southwood Smith was an important figure in his day, whose work initiated many public health reforms. He served on the royal commission on children's employment, and was medical representative on the General Board of Health to deal with the cholera epidemic of 1848. This biography, written by his granddaughter Gertrude, who was G. H. Lewes' daughter-in-law, was published in 1898.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER II
16
CHAPTER IV
49
RISE OF THE SANITARY MOVEMENT 1837
60
CHAPTER VI
72
THE TEN YEARS STRUGGLE FOR SANITARY
102
Causes of delay History of the sanitary movement at this
107
CHAPTER VIII
127
CHAPTER IX
139
CHAPTER X
147
CHAPTER XI
153
LETTER FROM MR TAYLOR ASSISTANT RETURNING
159
INDEX
167
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