Draftsman's Manual: Or, "How Can I Learn Architecture?" Hints to Enquirers. Directions in Draftsmanship

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Wm. T. Comstock, 1882 - Architectural drawing - 80 pages
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Page 32 - ... doors — viz. square and flat, bead butt, bead flush, moulded, all on one or both sides. He should be able to draw in elevation, and to give vertical and horizontal sections of, the following window sashes and frames — viz. single or...
Page 31 - ... or side), section, sectional elevation. He should understand the object of bond in brickwork, ie, English bond, Flemish bond, or English bond with Flemish facing, and how it is attained in walls up to three bricks thick, in the following instances, viz. — footings with offsets, angles of buildings, connection of external and internal walls, window and door openings with reveals and square jambs, external gauged arches (camber, segmental, and semicircular), internal discharging arches over lintels,...
Page 34 - He must be able to solve simple problems in the theory of construction, such as in the case of a beam supported at both ends, to ascertain the proportion of the load transmitted to each point of support, and to determine the safe dimensions of iron or wooden beams subjected to dead loads. In ordinary roof trusses and framed structures of a similar description, he must be able to trace the stresses, brought into action by the load, from the points of application to the points of support, as well as...
Page 31 - ... and length ; and of the following dressings — viz. window sills, window and door jambs, plain window and door heads, door steps, string courses, quoins, copings, common cornices, blocking courses ; and of the following methods of connecting stones — viz. by cramps, dowels, joggles, and lead plugs. He should be able to show how to join timbers by halving, lapping, notching, cogging, scarfing, fishing, and mortise and tenon ; as applied to wall plates, roof timbers, floors, ceilings, and partitions....
Page 33 - ... on all the subjects previously enumerated for the elementary and advanced Courses. He must possess a more complete knowledge of building materials, their application, strength, and how to judge of their quality ; and in the case of iron, of the processes of manufacture, and the points to be attended to in order to insure sound castings, and good riveting.
Page 31 - He should be able to draw, from given dimensions, single, double, and framed floors, with or without ceilings beneath them ; showing modes of supporting, stiffening, and framing the timbers, trimming round hearths and wells of stairs ; also floor coverings of boards or battens, rebated and filleted, ploughed and tongued, and laid folding, with straight or broken joints, bevelled or square heading joints.
Page 32 - ... with door openings. He should be able to draw in elevation, and give vertical and horizontal sections of, solid door frames and window frames. He should be able to describe, by drawings, headings of different kinds, dovetailing, cross-grooving, rebating, plough-grooving, chamfering, rounded nosing, and housings.
Page 31 - FIRST STAGE, OR ELEMENTARY COURSE. It is assumed that the student has already mastered the use of the following drawing instruments : — Rulers, ordinary and parallel ; ruling pen ; compasses, with pen and pencil, bow-sweeps, as well as the construction and use of simple scales, such as...
Page 33 - He should be able, in the case of a concentrated or uniform load or any part of a beam supported at both ends, to ascertain the proportion of the load transmitted to each point of support. 3rd. The nature, application, and characteristic peculiarities of the following materials in ordinary use for building purposes, viz. :— Bricks of different kinds in common use, York, Portland Caen, and Bath stones (or stones of a similar description), granite, pure lime, hydraulic lime, Portland...
Page 31 - ... the meaning of such terms as plan, elevation (front, back, or side), section, sectional elevation. He should understand the object of bond in brickwork, ie English bond, Flemish bond, or English bond with Flemish facing, and how it is attained in walls up to three bricks thick, in the following instances — viz.

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