Dramatic Masterpieces by Greek, Spanish, French, German, and English Dramatists, Volume 1

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Co-operative Publication Society, 1900 - Drama
 

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Page 419 - To guess at this distance, you can't be much above forty (approaching). Yet, nearer, I don't think so much (approaching). By coming close to some women they look younger still ; but when we come very close indeed — (attempting to kiss her). Miss Hard. Pray, sir, keep your distance. One would think you wanted to know one's age, as they do horses, by mark of mouth. Mar. I protest, child, you use me extremely ill.
Page 391 - Crack-skull common : there you must look sharp for the track of the wheel, and go forward, till you come to farmer Murrain's barn. Coming to the farmer's barn, you are to turn to the right, and then to the left, and then to the right about again, till you find out the old mill Mar. Zounds, man ! we could as soon find out the longitude ! Hast.
Page 400 - Why, really, sir, your bill of fare is so exquisite, that any one part of it is full as good as another. Send us what you please. So much for supper. And now to see that our beds are aired, and properly taken care of.
Page 384 - Blessings on my pretty innocence ! Drest out as usual, my Kate. Goodness! What a quantity of superfluous silk hast thou got about thee, girl ! I could never teach the fools of this age, that the indigent world could be clothed out of the trimmings of the vain.
Page 393 - You must not be so talkative, Diggory. You must be all attention to the guests. You must hear us talk, and not think of talking; you must see us drink, and not think of drinking ; you must see us eat, and not think of eating. Diggory.
Page 406 - I'm certain he scarce looked in my face the whole time. Yet the fellow, but for his unaccountable bashfulness, is pretty well too. He has good sense, but then so buried in his fears, that it fatigues one more than ignorance.
Page 445 - Marlow. (Kneeling.) Does this look like security? Does this look like confidence? No, madam, every moment that shows me your merit, only serves to increase my diffidence and confusion.
Page 389 - There be two gentlemen in a post-chaise at the door. They have lost their way upo' the forest ; and they are talking something about Mr.
Page 426 - HARD. Young man, young man, from your father's letter to me. I was taught to expect a well-bred modest man as a visitor...
Page 425 - Though I'm but a servant, I'm as good as another man. I'll drink for no man before supper, sir, damme ! Good liquor will sit upon a good supper, but a good supper will not sit upon — hiccup — on my conscience, sir. Marlow — You see, my old friend, the fellow is as drunk as he can possibly be.

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