Draw: Rules for Playing Poker

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Priv. print., 1880 - Poker - 17 pages
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Page 3 - Any one at the time of going in must put up as much as double the ante, and may put up as much more as he pleases by way of "raising" the ante, in which case every other player must put up as much as will make his stake equal to such increase, or else abandon what he has already put in. Each player, as he makes good and equals the others who are in before him, can thus increase the ante if he chooses, compelling the others still to come up to that increase or to abandon their share in the pool. All...
Page 5 - The players must throw away their discarded cards before taking up or looking; at those they draw. In the game every player is for himself and against all others, and to that end will not let any of his cards be seen, nor betray the value of his hand by drawing or playing out of his turn, or by change of countenance or any other sign. It is a great object to mystify your adversaries up to the " call,
Page 3 - If a number of players have gone in, it is best generally for the ante man to make good, and go in, even with a poor hand, because half his stake is already up, and he can therefore stay in for half as much as the others have had to put up, which is a percentage in favor of his taking the risk. This, of course, does not apply if any one has "raised," that is, more than doubled the ante before it comes around to the starting point.
Page 10 - ... pat" hand. A bold player will sometimes decline to draw any cards, and pretend to have a pat hand, and play it as such, when he has none. A skilful player will watch and observe what each player draws, the expression of the face, the circumstances and manner of betting, and judge, or try to judge, of the value of each hand opposed to him accordingly. No one is bound to answer the question, how many cards he drew, except the dealer ; and the dealer is not bound to tell after the betting has begun.
Page 12 - ... fours in his original hand, it is as good as it can be ; and yet it is best to throw away the outside card, and draw one, because others may then think he is only drawing to two pairs, or for a flush or a sequence, and will not suspect the great value of the hand. When one is in (as he ought seldom to be) without even so much as a pair, his choice must be either to discard four cards, or three cards, and draw to the highest or two highest in the hand ; or throw away the whole hand, and draw five...
Page 11 - It is advisable sometimes to keep an ace, or other high card, as an " outsider," with a small pair, and draw but one card—thus taking the chances of matching the high card, and so getting a good two pairs, or something better possibly—while at the same time others may be deceived into believing that the player is drawing to threes. When drawing to cards of the same suit, to try to make a flush, or to cards of successive denominations, to try to make a sequence, as many more cards are to be taken...
Page 9 - bluff" is to take the risk of betting high enough on a poor hand or a worthless one, to make all the other players lay down their hands without seeing or calling you. When a hand is complete, so that the holder of it can play without drawing to better it, that is called a "pat" hand. A bold player will sometimes decline to draw any cards, and pretend to have a pat hand, and play it as such, when he has none. A skilful player will watch and observe what each player draws, the expression of the face,...
Page 7 - ... holding the age." and this being an advantage, should as a general rule be practiced. Each bettor in turn must put into the pool a sum equal at least to the first bet made ; but each may in turn increase the bet or raise it as it comes to him; in which case the bets, proceeding around in order, must be made by each player in his turn...
Page 11 - If he holds three to begin with, he draws two cards, in order to have the best chance of making a full, inasmuch as, in playing, pairs are apt to run together. But to deceive his adversaries, and make them think he has nothing better than two pairs, a sharp player will draw but one card to his threes. It is advisable sometimes to keep an ace, or other high card, as an

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