Dreams

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B.W. Huebsch, 1914 - Dreams - 57 pages
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Page 57 - ... is opening. I do not doubt that wonderful discoveries await it there, as important, perhaps, as have been in the preceding centuries the discoveries of the physical and natural sciences.
Page 15 - I perceive objects and there is nothing there. I see men; I seem to speak to them and I hear what they answer; there is no one there and I have not spoken. It is all as if real things and real persons were there, then on waking all has disappeared, both persons and things. How does this happen?
Page 49 - That i what it is to be awake. That is what it is to live the normal psychical life. It is to battle. It is to will. As for the dream, have you really any need that I should explain it? It is the state into which you naturally fall when you let yourself go, when you no longer have the power to concentrate...
Page 56 - To explore the most sacred depths of the unconscious, to labor in what I have just called the subsoil of consciousness — that will be the principal task of psychology in the century which is opening.
Page 34 - But the memories which are preserved in these obscure depths are there in the state of 34 invisible phantoms. They aspire, perhaps, to the light, but they do not even try to rise to it; they know that it is impossible and that I, as a living and acting being, have something else to do than to occupy myself with them. But suppose that, at a given moment, I become disinterested in the present situation, in the present action — in short, in all which previously has fixed and guided my memory; suppose,...
Page 49 - That is what it is to live the normal psychical life. It is to battle. It is to will. As for the dream, have you really any need that I should explain it? It is the state into which you naturally fall when you let yourself go, when you no longer have the power to concentrate yourself upon a single point, when you have ceased to will.
Page 33 - But behind the memories which are concerned in our occupations and are revealed by means of it, there are others, thousands of others, stored below the scene illuminated by consciousness. Yes, I believe indeed that all our past life is there, preserved even to the most infinitesimal details, and that we forget nothing, and that all that we have felt, perceived, thought, willed, from the first awakening of our consciousness, survives indestructibly.
Page 31 - In sleep, properly speaking, in sleep which absorbs our whole personality, it is memories and only memories which weave the web of our dreams. But often we do not recognize them. They may be very old memories, forgotten during waking hours, drawn from the most obscure depths of our past; they may be, often are, memories of objects we have perceived distractedly, almost unconsciously, while awake.
Page 6 - our memories are packed away under pressure like steam in a boiler, and the dream is their escape- valve...
Page 11 - But from this it results that one of the r61es of the brain is to limit the vision of the mind, to render its action more efficacious. That is what we observe in regard to the memory, where the r6le of the brain is to mask the useless part of our past in order to allow only the useful remembrances to appear. Certain useless recollections, or dream remembrances, manage nevertheless to appear also, and to form a vague fringe around...

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