Dreams & Reality: Revelations on the Nature of Man & God

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Trafford Publishing, 2003 - Philosophy - 246 pages
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Dreaming is a universal phenomenon. Nearly everybody dreams and is anxious to know what it means. Perhaps no other human experience has aroused so much interest and curiosity as this alien visitation that forces itself upon us without warning during the dead of sleep. Since antiquity, thousands of books and articles have been written to shed some light on this mysterious, and often unwelcome nightly visitor. Despite tremendous work in this field, the riddle remains unsolved. Still no satisfactory answers have been provided to these basic questions: Why do we dream? What are dreams about? Where do they come from? How can we understand them?

This book is significantly different from those of others in this area, as the answers presented are not the author's own views; they are largely his dreams' answers to the questions just posed. Instead of speculation, this author, a psychologist by profession, has put forward what his own dreams have consistently and persistently revealed to him over the past thirty years. Since 1973, he has recorded over 100, 000 dreams, filling some 230 journals of 200 pages each. The length of the dreams varies greatly; some consist of a single word or phrase, others fill a page or more.

This book is written to share with others what the author has gained from his journey into the dreamworld and from his long and patient analysis of this vast number of dreams. Three conclusions have been drawn from this investigation: 1) Dreams are not caused by repressed sexual wishes, somatic sources, impressions of the preceding days, or other mundane instigators, as claimed by Freud and his followers; 2) Dreams do have a supernatural source, as pronounced by many writers through the ages; and 3) Through dreams this supernatural source reveals to us who we really are, brings to light who He is, and invites us to lead our own lives sensibly and purposefully.

Using his own dreams as illustrations, the author addresses a wide variety of topics relating to the domain of dreams, including: Are dreams a source of creativity? Why do some of us have frequent nightmares? Can we control the content of our dreams? Why are dreams so cryptic? How can we decipher our dream symbols to understand their meanings? Do characters in our dreams refer to persons we know of, or do they stand for components of our own identity? How should we understand the verbal contents of our dreams? Can dreams guide us as to how we should conduct our lives? Is the reality we experience during our dreams more dependable or the one we experience in waking life?

The main purpose of the book is to elucidate that dreams are trustworthy teachers. In the realm of growth and self-discovery, we must regard as suspect whatever we learn from others, however wise and well-meaning. But whatever is conveyed to us directly, through dreams, is credible since it emanates from within us and is free from inconsistencies and adulterations. Our major challenge is to understand the symbolic language used by the wise guide we have within.

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About the author (2003)

The author, who has adopted the name of Simon S. Godfrey, was educated at Columbia University, where he was a Fulbright Scholar. He has a Ph.D. in psychology, and for years practiced psychotherapy, taught graduate courses, conducted workshops, and undertook extensive research on dreams. His intense involvement with the field of dreams led him to trespass on a path that, for millennia, has been the jurisdiction of religion and theology. He found that human nature is far greater than it has been depicted, that a superhuman power is at work in the world, and that there is a close affinity between humans and this superhuman power. Thus, he became disenchanted with the scientism of a discipline that had been banished from consideration the self and other negative concepts. This gave the author the freedom he needed to explore beyond the constraints set by the lore of formal psychology and navigate in the realm of metaphysics. Consequently, he can now express his views forthrightly and unapolegetically, as is evident from his present work-"The Nature of Man and God: A New Look.

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