Dress Clothing of the Plains Indians

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University of Oklahoma Press, Aug 1, 1990 - Crafts & Hobbies - 219 pages
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In the current surge of interest in the history and culture of the American Indian it has become obvious that detailed information about many aspects of Indian life is all but inaccessible to any but the most diligent researchers. In the matter of Indian dress there are, of course, the stereotypes worn by actors in motion pictures and television productions, but they are for the most part highly inaccurate, crafted in designers’ studios for effect rather than authenticity.

This book assembles for the first time reliable information about the dress of the Plains Indians. In counters the misconception that all the tribes of the central region dressed alike. Although certain similarities could be found among the groups, each tribe had its own distinctive traditions and preferences in cut, color, decorative symbols, and trim, as well as in style of hair and headdress, footwear, and accessories. The author became aware of the need for a book such as this when he was helping make Indian costumes for exhibitions and dances. He searched early monographs, other reliable documents, and museums to compile for his own use the information on which this book is based.

The hobbyist, as well as the historian and anthropologist, will find here the information he has been seeking: patterns of shirts, robes, and moccasins; colors and designs used by specific tribes; the symbolism of details of ceremonial dress. The visitor to Indian gatherings will recognize old-and-new style elements in the dance costumes and learn to appreciate their meanings.

 

 

 

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Contents

The People of the Plains
3
Feathers
7
Color and Painted Designs
23
Quillwork
35
Tapered lanes in quillwork
37
PshanShaw
39
Native Ornaments
41
Blackfoot medicine man
45
Roaches
100
Rawhide sun visor
102
Skins and Shirts
105
Stitches
106
Mens pictographic designs
109
Mandan shirt
127
Preparing a war shirt
128
Cheyenne quilled shirt
129

Chief of the Assiniboins
47
Gros Ventre group
48
Beads
51
Beadwork techniques
55
Blackfoot designs
58
Crow designs
60
Western Sioux designs
62
Assiniboin dancers
68
Metal
69
Metalworking in Peyote style
70
Bells
72
Buttons
75
Ball and cone earring
76
Metal ornaments
78
Mirror boards
79
Sioux Ghost Dance
80
Cloth
81
Construction of a blanket capote
84
Thongs holding cloth patches
85
Blackfoot hat
86
Assumptionsash patterns
87
Hair and Headgear
89
Crow hair styles
90
Chippewa hair styles
92
Omaha haircutting
93
Typical hair bow
94
Caddo hairbow pattern
95
Hair wheels
96
Otterfur turbans
97
Old Eagle
98
Plume holder
99
Plains Cree man
130
Womens dress patterns in hide
132
Dresses
133
Womens dress patterns in cloth
135
Leggings
137
Legging patterns and styles
138
Pawnee leggings
140
The saver
142
Bottompanel cloth legging Crow
143
Moccasin patterns
144
Footwear
145
Comanche moccasin
147
Moccasintoe decorations 14849
148
Elk Cult
152
Dance and Group Costumes
153
Oldtime Sioux dancers
157
Oldtime Sioux costumes
158
Oldtime Sioux costumes
160
Oldtime Sioux costumes
162
Oldtime Sioux costumes
164
Oldtime Sioux costume
166
Straight dancer
167
Kiowa skin dress
168
Comparisons Among Selected Tribes
171
Appendices
177
A Suppliers
179
B Museums
181
Notes
183
Bibliography
201
Index
215
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Ronald P. Koch received the degrees of bachelor of arts and master of education from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He was a member of the Biochemistry Department of that university and later a research analyst in Roswell Park Memorial Institute, Buffalo. He has served as a Boy Scout executive and in that capacity has assisted in the production of Indian exhibitions. He has also had a long association with the Buffalo Indian Dancers, affiliated with the Buffalo (New York) Museum of Science.

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