Dropping Ashes on the Buddha: The Teaching of Zen Master Seung Sahn

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Stephen Mitchell
Grove Press, 1976 - Philosophy - 232 pages
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“Somebody comes into the Zen center with a lighted cigarette, walks up to the Buddha statue, blows smoke in its face, and drops ashes on its lap. You are standing there. What can you do?” This is a problem that Zen Master Seung Sahn is fond of posing to his American students who attend his Zen centers. Dropping Ashes on the Buddha is a delightful, irreverent, and often hilariously funny living record of the dialogue between Korean Zen Master Seung Sahn and his American students. Consisting of dialogues, stories, formal Zen interviews, Dharma speeches, and letters using the Zen Master’s actual words in spontaneous, living interaction with his students, this book is a fresh presentation of the Zen teaching method of “instant dialogue” between Master and student which, through the use of astonishment and paradox, leads to an understanding of ultimate reality.

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User Review  - Arctic-Stranger - LibraryThing

Seung Sahn is unorthodox, even from a Zen perspective, but his teachings stand the test of time. Reading this book is like eating a fireball. There is truth here, but you will only find it in yourself. Read full review

Contents

Zen Is Understanding Yourself
3
The Zen Circle
5
My Dharma Is Too Expensive
8
Copyright

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About the author (1976)

Poet and writer Stephen Mitchell attended Amherst College, the Sorbonne, and Yale University. He has been training in Zen mediation for more than 25 years. His book, Real Power, uses ancient wisdom to study power, the key to business. Mitchell also translated the Tao Te Ching.

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