Dude, Where's My Country?

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Warner Books, 2003 - Humor - 249 pages
2 Reviews
When the powers-that-be succeeded in ignoring and then silencing the nations widespread dissent over war, one man stood on an Oscar stage and, in front of a billion people, outed the commander in chief for his fictitious presidency and his fictitious war. Now, just a few months later, those words have remarkably become the accepted truth of the land.

Yes, Michael Moore is the scourge of Stupid White Men everywhere. He's taken on fat cats, gun nuts, lying politicians. The Guardian describes him as a wake-up cal l, a kick in the mental backside. And now he's back daring to ask the most urgent question of these perilous times:

Dude, Where's My Country?

Michael Moore is on a mission in his new book: Regime Change. The man who slithered into the White House on tracks greased by his daddys oil buddies is one of many targets in Mikes blistering follow-up to his smash #1 hit Stupid White Men, the biggest-selling nonfiction book of the year. Now no one is safe: corporate barons who have bilked millions out of their employees lifetime savings, legislators who have stripped away our civil liberties in the name of homeland security, and even that right-wing brother-in-law of yours (yes, we all have one) who manages, year after year, through his babbling idiocy, to ruin Thanksgiving dinner.

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Dude, Where's My Country?

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Moore, author of the best-selling Stupid White Men and the 2002 Oscar-winning documentary Bowling for Columbine, once again has the courage to question the powers that be-and starts at the top with ... Read full review

Review: Dude, Where's My Country?

User Review  - -uht! - Goodreads

I like Michael Moore's writing more than his documentaries. He's got a relaxed, fun style with a surprising amount of depth beneath it. The book is a bit reactionary in parts (moreso than Stupid White Men), but it was an enjoyable read and well documented and researched. Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Michael Francis Moore was born April 23, 1954 in Flint Michigan. After dropping out of the University of Michigan following his freshman year (where he wrote for the student newspaper The Michigan Times), Moore worked at the local Buick plant. At 22 he founded the alternative weekly magazine The Flint Voice, which soon changed its name to The Michigan Voice as it grew to cover the entire state. In 1986, when Moore became the editor of Mother Jones, a liberal political magazine, he moved to California and The Michigan Voice was shut down. Moore has been active in promoting his political views. Moore was a high-profile guest at both the 2004 Democratic National Convention and the 2004 Republican National Convention. He has directed and produced several documentaries such as Roger and Me, The Big One, Bowling for Columbine, Fahrenheit 9/11 and Capitalism: A Love Story. Between 1994 and 1995, he directed and hosted the BBC television series TV Nation, which followed the format of news magazine shows but covered topics they avoid. His other major series was The Awful Truth, which satirized actions by big corporations and politicians. In 1999 Moore won the Hugh M. Hefner First Amendment Award in Arts and Entertainment, for being the executive producer and host of The Awful Truth, where he was also described as "muckraker, author and documentary filmmaker".

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